White (albino) crow

Hi all,

I Over the last few weeks while out walking my dog, I have regularly spotted a pure white crow. I'm guessing it's an albino, and It really is a lovely sight, especially when in flight. It has got me wondering whether this is a common phenomenom, or am I seeing something quite rare?

I'm hoping I've come to the right place to find out.  I have posted some clips of the crow on youtube, so if anyone is interested let me know.

cheers for now

YouFUMS

  • Morning YouFUMS :)

    True albinism, whereby all melanin pigment is missing resulting in a pure white bird with red/pink eyes, is very rare in adult wild birds. This is because those affected usually have severe eyesight problems, and tend not to survive very long once they are independent of parental care. Of course, they are also more conspicuous to predators.

    More commonly seen (though still rare and unusual) is a condition in which the feather pigments are missing, giving white plumage, but the eyes (and therefore vision) are normal. Such birds are still more vulnerable to predators, but for larger species like crows with few natural predators this isn't such a severe handicap.

    Please do post a link to your youtube clips, would love to see the crow :)

    My blog: http://mazzaswildside.blogspot.co.uk/

    My Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/124028194@N04/

  • In reply to doggie:

    Once saw a white crow in my early days of birding and wondered what on earth it was,no forum to ask in those days.The local keeper put me right on that one,in faci I learnt a lot from him

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can

  • In reply to Seaman:

    Is it a condition called Lycistic that means birds get white feathers when they would not usually?

    Birds are well good innit!

  • In reply to Rockin Robin:

    should have been Leucistic. And i was wrong.

    Birds are well good innit!

  • In reply to Rockin Robin:

    There's some dispute over the correct terminology. Some people (including me!) use leucistic to mean what you describe - abnormal white plumage. The affected bird may be partly or completely white, but has normal eye colour (if it has red/pink eyes it's an albino). Others say that leucistic should be used to describe birds with only partial pigment loss, so their colours are paler than normal but not white.

    My blog: http://mazzaswildside.blogspot.co.uk/

    My Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/124028194@N04/

  • In reply to aiki:

    Ahhhh thanx Aiki. I've passed that info on to a few people now and I didnt wanna be misinforming ppl.

    Birds are well good innit!

  • In reply to Rockin Robin:

     Thanx for your replies, folks.

     It's looking like this bird may not be albino, for the reasons pointed out by Aiki. Unfortunately I have not been able to get too close to the crow, and the video images I took were taken at 35x zoom while trying to keep control of my dog :))  Not easy!

    anyhow...here is the link to the video I have posted on YouTube.  I would welcome further comments, and I'll endevour to get some better shots of it over the coming weeks.