Juvenile robins in our hedge.

Friends have identified several small birds, seen sitting in and flying from a hole in our hedge, as juvenile robins.  A male robin was seen in the same hole in the hedge as the juveniles.  Can robins breed this early?

  • If you are in mainland UK. I doubt that they are young Robins this early but I suppose not impossible.  Young Robins  do not look  like  their  parents so your friends  may be mistaken 

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can

  • In reply to Seaman:

    If you send a picture in someone else could double check it for you. Not saying your friends are wrong, but just in case!

    Regards

    Benji

  • I have no idea how to tell which is a male or female Robin. Can I ask how you know its a male?

    (Pardon the Scottish Accent)

  • Good comment Linda I only hope the Robins can tell

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can

  • In reply to BenjiS:

    Not me asking Benji

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can

  • In reply to Seaman:

    Yes I realized that, I was actually replying to MAnneM

    Regards

    Benji

  • Highly dubious for several reasons. As was raised, it's also questionable that a male robin could have been identified as male, esp at this time of year unless it is ringed.
  • I always understood the only clear way to sex a robin was at courtship, where the male feeds the female, I'm happy to be corrected.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Mike B:

    Mike I presume that ringers can sex Robins when they have them in the hand but for the average birder in the field I have always thought it was pretty near impossible without maybe spotting them mating

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can

  • In reply to Seaman:

    Wendy S said:
    Mike I presume that ringers can sex Robins when they have them in the hand but for the average birder in the field I have always thought it was pretty near impossible without maybe spotting them mating

    I believe one way to distinguish is the amount of grey plumage, males are supposed to be greyer (grey hairs, I know that scenario well, and baldness followed, the stresses of family life  ) at the lower part of the red breast, that could be one way they are able to sex robins, but seeing the difference whilst looking in the garden I find impossible, even with a pair close to each other.

    Another may be while ringing, they will have a clear view of the underside, but I'm wildly guessing.

    If there is someone who can help, I'd certainly welcome the feedback.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler