How to be a bad birdwatcher

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Craig B:

    Oops, what have I started!!

    I kinda guessed Seymour would not enjoy this book as it does observe birds from a simple and yet joyful viewpoint. However, for every Seymour there must be hundreds of birdwatching novices who will be much heartened by this book and can now call themselves 'bad' birdwatchers.

    Don't argue, chaps, just carry on enjoying what you do in whatever way you do it.

    Cheers

    Pipit

    ps. Sorry I missed your original thread Craig. x

     

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Craig B:

    Hi Craig

    Sounds my type of book that you have mentioned here

    Will look into you have mentioned with the author (dry wit or not I am flexible) - {big smile}

    Regards

    Kathy and Dave

    Craig B said:

    Hi Pipit,

    you maybe interested in this thread regarding wildlife books. I think I mentioned Simon Barnes book here too.

    Great little read and I love his dry wit.

    http://community.rspb.org.uk/forums/t/23389.aspx

    Thanks

    Craig

     

  • In reply to seymouraves:

    seymouraves said:

    The author does a great job in conveying the simple pleasure to be gained from watching birds. 

    The book could probably be summed up as "Enjoy what you see, whatever it is".

    Agreed :))  But I like to know WHAT  I'm looking at and where it's come from :)

    [/quote]

    I definitely agree with you; it is frustrating to not know what it is you're looking at, especially when you suspect it may be something you've never seen before.  But there is still pleasure to be gained from the common, from the birds you see every day.

    Perhaps I can rephrase it more accurately as: "Enjoy what you see, whether for the first or the thousandth time." I think that is more what the book is about. :o)

     

    Accept that some days you are the pigeon, and some days you are the statue.

    Dilbert

  • I too have read and enjoyed this book.

    It's just a simple, relaxed book best read on journeys to and from Reserves and Holidays.
    I quite like Barnes' easygoing style of writing, especially in the RSPB magazine. He makes some very observant points at times as well as surprising you with some insightful ideas that make you think.

    If you liked this book then I would suggest you buy his follow-up books:

    How to be a Bad Birdwatcher: To the Greater Glory of Life and

    A Bad Birdwatcher's Companion

    Best wishes, Graham

    My Blog!

    My Flickr!

  • In reply to McAlan:

    We all have a difference in opinion at times which is healthy and thought provoking. Debate is a good thing in my mind.

    I agree with McAlan - its not a book that will give you the different race plummages of the Yellow wagtail but it does however put some perspective on watching wildlife and the very enjoyment that you can take from it.

    thanks

    Craig

     

    Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better. - Albert Einstein

  • In reply to GrahamC:

     

    Hi-

    " I definitely agree with you; it is frustrating to not know what it is you're looking at, especially when you suspect it may be something you've never seen before.  But there is still pleasure to be gained from the common, from the birds you see every day. "

    Exactly why I made my comment about Goldcrest :)   An everyday bird that looks great, is unbelievable to look at in the hand and crosses oceans in autumn :))

    :)

    S

    ps- NOBODY but NOBODY  ( except maybe a Scandinavian ringer) looks at  Blue Tits asoften as I seem to  :) ***

     

    ***  possibly Hyperbole but not by much  :)

     

     

     

    For advice about Birding, Identification,field guides,  binoculars, scopes, tripods,  etc - put 'Birding Tips'   into the search box

  • In reply to seymouraves:

    seymouraves said:

    Exactly why I made my comment about Goldcrest :)   An everyday bird that looks great, is unbelievable to look at in the hand and crosses oceans in autumn :))

    I wish I lived where you lived, seymour, where a Goldcrest was an everyday bird. ;)

    And regarding Blue Tits, I doubt it is possible to notice one and then turn away. :)

    Anyway, I'll take a look at Simon Barnes' other books, what with Christmas coming up shortly...

    Accept that some days you are the pigeon, and some days you are the statue.

    Dilbert

  • In reply to McAlan:

     

    Hi-

     

    Goldcrests breed in the lone conifer in my garden :)

    S

    For advice about Birding, Identification,field guides,  binoculars, scopes, tripods,  etc - put 'Birding Tips'   into the search box

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to McAlan:

    Hi McAlan

    I must buy some of the books mentioned here but really to me, it depends how many hours are in the day.  I much rather be out and about, and seeing the bird species with my own eyes.  Still it is nice to hear other people's/author's prespective of birds by the written word in a book or an article in a magazine.

    Know what you mean about people in hides giving a running commentry about all what they see.  One of my own experiences over the weekend denoted exactly what you are saying here.  This person was loud.   Dave and I did everything to avoid eye contact due to the fact he wanted to talk about everything but birds!!!.  Dave and I talked in whispers between ourselves as we believe that is the polite thing to do in a bird hide.  He took offence at us and said I am not saying what birds we are seeing. and moved with a loud crash to the other side of the hide.

    Dave and I where on limited time at Norfolk.  We did not want this type of interaction with someone who was happy to dominate everything that was said.  I thought he was quite rude to be honest.

    Regards

    Kathy and Dave

    McAlan said:

    The author does a great job in conveying the simple pleasure to be gained from watching birds. 

    The book could probably be summed up as "Enjoy what you see, whatever it is".

    Agreed :))  But I like to know WHAT  I'm looking at and where it's come from :)

    [/quote]

    I definitely agree with you; it is frustrating to not know what it is you're looking at, especially when you suspect it may be something you've never seen before.  But there is still pleasure to be gained from the common, from the birds you see every day.

    Perhaps I can rephrase it more accurately as: "Enjoy what you see, whether for the first or the thousandth time." I think that is more what the book is about. :o)

     

    [/quote]

     

     

  • In reply to seymouraves:

    seymouraves said:
    ps- NOBODY but NOBODY  ( except maybe a Scandinavian ringer) looks at  Blue Tits asoften as I seem to  :)

    Hi seymour

    I look at blue tits every day. They are constantly in my garden so I see them whenever I watch the birds through my window, or indeed if I look through any windows to see if there are any cats around trying to bother the birds. :-)

    Best wishes Chris

    Click Here to see my photos