How to be a bad birdwatcher

  • In reply to Woodpecker:

     

    Blue Tit still in my top 10 birds :)

    S

    For advice about Birding, Identification,field guides,  binoculars, scopes, tripods,  etc - put 'Birding Tips'   into the search box

  • In reply to seymouraves:

    seymouraves said:

     

    Hi-

     

    devil's advocate here again;

     

    I was given this book for xmas once, and my dentist, osteopath and various others all ask me if I've read it because they enjoyed it.

    I did read it then deleted it from my hard drive I think , as I dont remember any of it except that from the title on I didnt like it. I spent 2 years getting to be a good birdwatcher then 35 getting to be a good birder.

    :)

    S

    Seymour think i am one of these bad birdwatchers but funny enough does not worry me and i do enjoy it.

    Of course you are in a different class and obviously more clued up and fantastically knowledgeable which allows the likes of me to be amazed at your I Ds and general knowledge,in fact we find that birders like you are often invaluable when we may be stuck for knowing what a certain bird is with a bit of luck someone like you will be around and freely be helpful.Think you must have a gift for birding as well as working at it but of course we haven't all got that gift 

  • In reply to Craig B:

    I'm a fairly prolific reader and tend to categorise books into two types, The read and re-read possibly repeatedly type, and the read once and put down indefinitely type. I read How to be a bad birdwatcher a few years back and, guess what - it went into the second category. I now can't remember a thing about it apart from the opening passages which involved seeing an urban Hobby (well I would remember that bit wouldn't I).

    I think that Mr Barnes's short articles are excellent. I'm just not sure that his style transfers that well to extended narrative.

    My most extensively re-read book of the last decade is Bill Bryson's Life and times of the Thunderbolt Kid. Even though I can almost quote most of it from memory it still causes me to laugh out loud. I nearly did myself an injury the first time I whipped through it.

    JBNTS

    Every day a little more irate about bird of prey persecution, and I have a cat - Got a problem with that?

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to John B (not the sloop):

    I agree John. I too am a prolific reader and there are hundreds of books I read once and a select few I re-read many times.

    Lifetime winner is Lord of the Rings (and yes, I loved the films too).

    Probably second is Ragged Trousered Philanthropists and I re-read Austen and Bronte books too.

    However I have to disagree slightly with your dismissing of Simon Barnes' book. I particularly enjoyed his narrative style. Many of his comments will stay with me for a long time.

    No, I probably will not read it again but I still put it up in the 'memorable books' category and I would recommend it to any bird lover.

    I love Bill Bryson but he is a one read guy for me.

    The one book that had me laughing out loud,even in public on the train, was Douglas Adam's Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

    It would be good to hear others' views and booky likes too.

    Pipit

  • In reply to Sooty:

    michael s said:

     

    Hi-

     

    devil's advocate here again;

     

    I was given this book for xmas once, and my dentist, osteopath and various others all ask me if I've read it because they enjoyed it.

    I did read it then deleted it from my hard drive I think , as I dont remember any of it except that from the title on I didnt like it. I spent 2 years getting to be a good birdwatcher then 35 getting to be a good birder.

    :)

    S

     

    Seymour think i am one of these bad birdwatchers but funny enough does not worry me and i do enjoy it.

    Of course you are in a different class and obviously more clued up and fantastically knowledgeable which allows the likes of me to be amazed at your I Ds and general knowledge,in fact we find that birders like you are often invaluable when we may be stuck for knowing what a certain bird is with a bit of luck someone like you will be around and freely be helpful.Think you must have a gift for birding as well as working at it but of course we haven't all got that gift 

    [/quote]

     

    Hi Sooty,

    the number one priority has to be whether you enjoy the birds :)  I noticed in that program on twitching ( program-makers agenda and editing apart) that the drive seemed to be to see more bird species not because they were fascinating creatures but merely to keep up with the birding jones's.... :(

    This weekend I shall be showing people birds in Norfolk- some will be birds they havent seen before - I get a real buzz out of seeing people enjoy a bird they've never seen before, and explain why it is .. what it is . For some of them it's a Cole  Tit, for some an American Golden Plover- it doesnt matter- the buzz is the same  :)

    S

     

     

     

     

    For advice about Birding, Identification,field guides,  binoculars, scopes, tripods,  etc - put 'Birding Tips'   into the search box