Coal Tit with crossed over beak!

Below is a heavily cropped photo of a coal tit with its beak crossed over!

The bird seems healthy enough, flying around and feeding on new shoots as well as all our feeders and managing to fly away with food, so it doesn't seem to be causing any issues.

However, I'm curious, is the beak deformed, or is the coal tit able to cross over its beak (which I know some birds can and do) to suit its feeding needs?

Mike

Flickr Peak Rambler

  • Hi Mike,   the bill is deformed but sometimes birds can manage just fine.  I've seen it a couple of times in my old garden SEE HERE    The deformities can vary greatly;  sadly even if you could take it to a vet and have the beak trimmed the likelihood (according to a professional I asked)  it would grow back again.      You may want to report it via BTO HERE

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    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • In reply to HAZY:

    HAZY said:

    Hi Mike,   the bill is deformed but sometimes birds can manage just fine.  I've seen it a couple of times in my old garden SEE HERE    The deformities can vary greatly;  sadly even if you could take it to a vet and have the beak trimmed the likelihood (according to a professional I asked)  it would grow back again.      You may want to report it via BTO HERE

    Thank you Hazel, you confirmed my suspicions. As for seeking any medical attention, I'm tempted to let nature take its course, the bird seemed to be eating fine and flying around without any issues, so my guess is its coping well, as do most animals.

    Many of us have seen dogs or cats with three legs and they often carry on for years as if nothing is out of the ordinary, many humans mange to move on with deformities, either from birth or dramatic life changing circumstances, I know, because I'm one of those with life changing circumstances.

    However, with regards to the coal tit, I guess that could change if the deformity becomes any worse. one thing is for sure, I'll be interested to see how things progress, if I ever see it in the garden again in the future.

    I did have a look at your page and also the BTO's, and completed their survey.

    Once again, thank you for the feedback, it was very informative and helpful.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • Well done Mike, all the data submitted to BTO helps with the statistics/records. Birds are so amazing in the face of adversity, they overcome so many challenges by finding a way to adapt around them. I love birds LOL

    _________________________________________________________________________

    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • In reply to HAZY:

    HAZY said:
    Well done Mike, all the data submitted to BTO helps with the statistics/records. Birds are so amazing in the face of adversity, they overcome so many challenges by finding a way to adapt around them. I love birds LOL

    Absolutely, and times will get tougher, not just for birds, but all wildlife, plants and trees, especially once this is over. I fear as a species, we'll become even more insular, and nature will have an even bigger fight to survive!

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • Some of you may recall my initial posting regarding a coal tit with a crossed over beak,

    There is good news, I think.

    I have seen it again today, on a feeder looking as healthy as ever, unless, we've another one....

    Whatever, here's a quick snap shot taken this morning:

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • Overall, the birds I've seen in the garden with crossed mandibles have always coped quite well and adapted to their situation. Good to see the coal tit doing well and eating ok.

    _________________________________________________________________________

    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • In reply to HAZY:

    HAZY said:
    Overall, the birds I've seen in the garden with crossed mandibles have always coped quite well and adapted to their situation. Good to see the coal tit doing well and eating ok.

    I've often wondered how it was doing, even though when I last saw it, there was no obvious signs of struggle or poor health, apart from the mandibles.

    Nature left to its own devices can be very resilient, its the art of survival, so long as man doesn't decimate the environment....

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • I'm happy to report, this coal tit seems to be coping well with its crossed mandible. I'm sure if it was struggling, the plumage wouldn't be looking ok, assuming nature hadn't taken its course full by now. Happy to see.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • Morning Mike, it's really good to see the coal tit coping ok with those overgrown mandibles. Birds are so clever at adapting to problems, I could never understand the saying "birdbrain" referring to someone that is an idiot as birds are certainly not stupid !

    _________________________________________________________________________

    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • In reply to HAZY:

    HAZY said:
    Morning Mike, it's really good to see the coal tit coping ok with those overgrown mandibles. Birds are so clever at adapting to problems, I could never understand the saying "birdbrain" referring to someone that is an idiot as birds are certainly not stupid !

    Definitely not stupid, we as a species are the stupid ones, present company excepted of course, and it is pleasing to see the little one surviving.

    I've looked up the lifespan of a coal tit, which is around two years, so there's a good chance it will live its lifespan through.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler