scaring peacocks away!

Hello All, I'm new here and hope to post about our good experiences of helping wildlife - but the immediate issue is something different.

Peacocks look great - especially in country parks and  gardens of large country homes.

BUT they are not so good as visitors to a normal sized garden.

We are enthusiastic about helping birds and other wildlife, we moved into our house two months ago and now have a great range of birds, some squirrels (we do not see them as a great problem for the birds, we just put out more food and they all get on together) and even a couple of deer pop in and eat an apple or two every now and again.

Our problem is peacocks, these are not welcome as they scare the other birds away and eat all the ground level food. They are messy, noisy and generally anti-social. Apparently next door had their car damaged by peacocks pecking their reflections and I am concerned they will damage the flat roof to our extension (they use it as a dance floor).

We would not want to do anything that would prevent the wood pigeons and other larger birds from visiting,

We would welcome suggestions, but replies supporting the peacocks are best only from those who have them as garden visitors and know the problem.

Thanks

  • Hi Steeping welcome to the community from Sheffield.

    The only thing I can add is do you know where they have come from?

    My Flickr photos

  • Hello Steeping and welcome to the community from me too.       When you say peacocks,  how many are there altogether ?    Some years ago in the month of October we had a Peacock arrive in our garden;    he had come from a local estate where the property had been sold and the 2 Peacocks and 2 Peahens abandoned, hence they all found their way into other peoples gardens or neghbourhoods.     We only had the one male bird who roosted in our tall oak tree at night.    It was one of the coldest autumn/winters on record so I fed him along with all the other garden birds and have to say, he was no trouble at all.    Obviously, he was a large bird requiring more food but he did not scare the other birds away and most days he would wander off after "breakfast" returning later on in the afternoon when I would feed him again before he went to roost back on the oak branch.     As breeding season approached,  around March onwards, he would occasionally call out although it wasn't constant or a nuisance.   Just natural instinct kicks in as he grows his magnificient plumage and then next step to call for a female.       He then disappeared again at the beginning of May as the breeding season would be underway and he went in search of a mate.       He arrived as a very tatty and shy bird, nervous of people but in the 5 months he was in our garden he became used to our presence and we found him an absolute delight to watch.    

    I do however, undertand that if you have more than one male the noise could become irritating and no doubt, two males or more would be rivals and maybe cause more problems.     If you have a large country estate in your area or similar the peacocks may have come from there.   Hopefully as the spring approaches they may wander off as ours did in search of a mate.         I would make a few enquiries in your area or ask around to see if anyone has knowledge of where these birds might have come from.  

    I guess the last thing you want is to see any more peacocks !!     but I took a few pics and video clip on my little digi-camera back in 2011/2012.   He was a beautiful bird, fortunately, he did not damage our car or flat roof above the kitchen and did his magical display on the neigbours flat-roof and we missed him terribly when he was gone.     I hope he found his lady.    

    Post edit: .......  I found a bit more info on peafowl HERE although this PDF sheet has come from a Welsh site you may be able to ask them for advice.          ** It also says at the bottom I may have been wrong to feed the one that came to our garden but with such a severe winter with minus 17 degrees I wasn't about to let it starve.

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    Regards, Hazel 

    My Flickr. photo  link HERE 

  • Hello Steeping, welcome from me in Caithness, up at the very top of Scotland. Can give you no help at all regarding the peacocks, sorry, hopefully you will get advice from others. Good luck.

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

  • In reply to Alan.:

    Hello, and thanks for the replies.

    When we were looking for a new home we saw some peacocks wandering along the road  - and thought it looked so good.  When we moved in we were quite pleased to see them come into our garden - but at that time we had not started feeding the wild birds.

    They come from a house at the end of the road - they leave their gate open so they wander about and fly anywhere they want (I never realised peacocks flew until living here and the first morning a very big dark shadow crossed my bedroom window). As a newcomer to the area I do not want to start trouble, although I know our neighbour is not happy about the car pecking.

    I feel it is the responsibility of the owners to make sure they are properly fed.

    Today we had our "Farthing Wood" with squirrel, tits sparrows, starlings, blackbirds, collared doves, wood pigeons and a brief visit from half a dozen crows and a deer - then the peacocks turned up and one ran at the deer scaring it away and then took control of the feeding area so no ground feeding birds could stay. We do go out and tell them to go - they know we are not happy and often fly away just seeing us.

    There are two groups - one of 7 birds and the other of 9, mixed peacocks and peahens so I assume there will be quite a lot of trouble between them in the spring!  If they just popped in and took their turn with the other birds we would not mind, although it may be we could not afford to feed 16 peacocks!

  • In reply to steeping:

    Blimey I don't envy you with that number of them, googling the problem there is this article here https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/animals/controlling-peacocks.htm a hose pipe may be one answer.

    My Flickr photos

  • In reply to steeping:

    Oh dear, it sounds like there are rather a lot of peacocks at that house down your road so would suggest the birds are the responsibility of the owner of that home and if damage is incurred to property/car of you or any of your neighbours than you could have legal recourse against them for nuisance damage, etc.,        It is totally their responsibility to ensure the peafowl are not causing a nuisance and would most likely be obliged to pen them if this is the case and they are bothering the neighbourhood.    If it gets too bad I would get together with your neighbours affected and draft a polite letter to the owner of the peafowl asking him/her to take action;   failing that you may be able to take the matter further by contacting the relevant authorities.   Very often a quiet word will suffice without resorting to further and less favourable measures so good luck and hope the owner of the peafowl can see your side of things and oblige.     If you have to take legal action then make sure you have sufficient evidence of any damage and photos of the peafowl on your property.   

    Another thought is ............perhaps these people at the end of your road are possibly breeding peafowl if they have so many and selling them on so another option would be to contact your local council and ask for advice.    

    _________________________________________________________________________

    Regards, Hazel 

    My Flickr. photo  link HERE 

  • In reply to Alan.:

    I'm thinking of getting one of the automatic hose gadgets, will also work with the cats but I hope they can be adjusted so they don;t go off for the usual birds. One of the pump up water pistols might be useful too. I have sent an email to DEFRA to ask their views as they police the law about introducing non-native species.