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I was reading something Seymour posted this evening, when my dad looked over my shoulder and said, "nice duck."

I replied confidently, "Oh, that's a Goldeneye."

Then I looked again, and thought maybe it wasn't a Goldeneye, since it doesn't seem to have (er...) a golden eye.

Then I thought maybe it was a funny looking Tufty.

Then I remembered it belonged to Seymouraves, and it could just as well be a lesser-spotted Macedonian duck-faced warbler (last seen in Britain in 1964, in an obscure bit of Norfolk).

Then I just felt really stupid.

Please could somebody put me out of my misery (maybe even Seymour, if you haven't gone to Greece yet)?

BB

P.S. Naturally my dad lost interest shortly after "nice duck" - he's more of an internet dating sort of guy!

  • I haven't got a clue really but I don't think it's a golden eye or a tufty though. I have been an admirer of that duck for several weeks now...being a bit of a duck fan. Would also like to know what it is. Possibly some sort of scaup...but not the usual variety.

    PS. Don't google 'rare duck' by the way...unless you want cooking tips !

  • In reply to Bella:

    clare b said:

    PS. Don't google 'rare duck' by the way...unless you want cooking tips !

    :-))

    Andy

    Seriously thinking about trying harder!

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Bella:

    LOL Bella - that is the thing with google you never know what answer you will get to a perfectly ordinary question.

    I think it may be a 'Goldeneye'! at a guess here {hides incase it is wrong}

    Regards

    Kathy and Dave

  • In reply to Jackdaw:

    It's a female Harlequin Duck :) Lives in Iceland, Greenland and elsewhere in the Arctic. About 14 British records.

    My blog: http://mazzaswildside.blogspot.co.uk/

    My Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/124028194@N04/

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to aiki:

    Hi aiki

    Now that is something I did not expect

    Lovely name for a lovley duck

    No doubt Seymour will tell us the story of his travels and tell us where the photos was taken

    Regards

    Kathy and Dave

  • In reply to aiki:

    aiki said:
    It's a female Harlequin Duck :) Lives in Iceland, Greenland and elsewhere in the Arctic. About 14 British records.

    Don't know why he didn't choose the male, it's much more colourful. Here's a pair I photographed in Iceland last summer.

    ____________________________________________________________________

    Regards,Tony

    My Flickr Photostream 

  • In reply to aiki:

    aiki said:

    It's a female Harlequin Duck :) Lives in Iceland, Greenland and elsewhere in the Arctic. About 14 British records. 

    So I can be forgiven for not recognising her then.  Thank you.

    And thanks for the photo, TeeJay.  The male is definitely more colourful, but the female has a certain muted charm...

    BB

  • In reply to TeeJay:

    Maybe it's cos all the long-staying mainland UK records since the 1960s (ie since Seymour has been birding) have been females :)

    My blog: http://mazzaswildside.blogspot.co.uk/

    My Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/124028194@N04/

  • In reply to aiki:

    aiki said:

    Maybe it's cos all the long-staying mainland UK records since the 1960s (ie since Seymour has been birding) have been females :)

     

    That's true... most 'megas' in UK are females or immatures, like the sib rubythroat(actually, there's been one striking male but it was scared away by twitchers....)

    Also 75% of all smews in UK seems to be redheads :)

    'Dip a dee dah, dip a dee ay, we're not seeing any birds to-day...'

  • In reply to Tern:

    Darcy N said:

    Maybe it's cos all the long-staying mainland UK records since the 1960s (ie since Seymour has been birding) have been females :)

     

    That's true... most 'megas' in UK are females or immatures, like the sib rubythroat(actually, there's been one striking male but it was scared away by twitchers....)

    Also 75% of all smews in UK seems to be redheads :)

    [/quote]

    Juveniles are much likelier to migrate the wrong way than their more experienced parents!

    75% redheads sounds about right - 25% adult males, 25% adult females, 25% first-winter males and 25% first-winter females :)

     

    My blog: http://mazzaswildside.blogspot.co.uk/

    My Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/124028194@N04/