Nature on Your Doorstep Community

A place to learn, share and inspire others to create a haven for you and for wildlife.

Sign In or Register to join the conversation

Trees for exposed Scottish Coastal Garden

I have a property on the west coast of Scotland and would like to add some trees to the garden not only for garden interest but also to attract birds. I am considering the Olympic Flame Rowan for a particularly exposed spot and a Weeping Birch for a slightly less exposed spot. 

I am also considering investing in mature trees (average 3m delivered) , but as they are VERY expensive I am wary incase it turns out to be a costly mistake. 

Would welcome any advice on suitable trees, and whether I should just stick with smaller 12 ltr potted stock. 

I also noted from comments a few years ago that people had mentioned Maples which I love, but I thought they would be too fragile for an exposed garden - again would welcome your thoughts.

Thanks

  • Personally I can't help, but another resource would probably be something like the RHS site, as there they would have more info and knowledge (probably) regarding soil types and depths required too.
  • Thanks - I'll give that try.
  • Some suggestions I would have would be a beach tree hedge, they can be planted quite close together, can be kept trimmed to your choice of height, would,have good protection, would have a lovely coverage for the birdies and have lovely autumnal colours. Willow trees would would be a good choice as well, cuttings very easily taken from a mature tree and stuck in the ground. I have done this, many bits will not take but when they so they come on quickly. Off to have google to see what else I can come up with. Back in a bit....

    Found this website, you may get ideas from it. You can buy bare rooted or potted. Good luck.

    https://www.hedgesdirect.co.uk/acatalog/Hedging-for-Exposed-Sites-Guide.html

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

  • In reply to Catlady:

    Thanks - I also looked at some Willow. A Field Maple is another hardy option that is good of birds too.
  • I'd look at what trees are in the area, and pick from those. It does depend on size of area involved and how close to properties it is. I suspect one or two of the species mentioned wouldn't take the conditions if it's a really exposed part of western Scotland.
  • To keep project cheaper I would recommend bare root trees - Nov-March is bare root season and always use 'rootgrow' when planting as it helps trees establish better.

    Look at what grows well in your local area and maybe plant some shrubs too to help as wind break? Gorse is a hardy option.

    RSH and Gardner's World website have info for costal planting.

    Locally sourced plants will fair better then anything imported. I source most of my trees and hedging plants from

    Best4Hedging or British Hardwood Trees however they may not have the sizes you want. If starting with larger plants they will need staking very well to prevent root rock and allow them to establish.
  • To keep project cheaper I would recommend bare root trees - Nov-March is bare root season and always use 'rootgrow' when planting as it helps trees establish better.

    Look at what grows well in your local area and maybe plant some shrubs too to help as wind break? Gorse is a hardy option.

    RSH and Gardner's World website have info for costal planting.

    Locally sourced plants will fair better then anything imported. I source most of my trees and hedging plants from

    Best4Hedging or British Hardwood Trees however they may not have the sizes you want. If starting with larger plants they will need staking very well to prevent root rock and allow them to establish.
  • Thank you, I will take a look.