What time(s) do you see birds in your garden?

  • In reply to Janet:

    Hi Janet nice one suppose I am a bit touchy being retired farmer at least you didn't take offence but doubt you not older,probably needed to be a Neil Diamond song.

    Another day something else learnt thank you.Best wishes.  

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Janet:

    Hi Janet

    Remember the song well!

    It is well worded to make us think of our planet a whole lot

    Regards

    Kathy and Dave

     

  • In reply to Sooty:

    Hi Sooty

    I can understand your side, but I wasn't being funny about farmers, some of my friends are farmers, i just like the song.

    :-)

    Hey farmer, farmer, put away the D.D.T now. Give me spots on my apples, but leave me the birds and the bees, please!

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Sooty:

    Hi sooty

    I remember DDT Powder very well.

    When I was a youngster in the late 60's, I remember using DDT Powder to remove 'Lice' from my ponies coat.  That was the cure at the time to get rid of Lice.

    I remember flicking the DDT Powder around like Talcum powder all over the place and inhaling it.

    Never knew it was banned now - scary thought.

    Regards

    Kathy and Dave

     

     

  • To bring this post back to the original question if I may.

    A robin is generally my first and last visitor, but then all the birds seem to come together several times during the day.  The Wood pigeons and starlings are usually sitting on the TV ariels of surrounding houses when i first go out, and swoop down as soon as i come back inside.

    My two blue tits always come together but are grab and go types so retun several times up untils it is nearlly dark.   The rain does sometimes put them off.

    The sparrows that live just behind my house in two large conifers send out a female fore runner then arrive en masse several times a day. 

    8ish, lunch time and about 3 are the busiest times but i only put food out in the morning during the week due to a rat problem in the neighbours garden (rented house lots of rubbish) yuk!

    Sarah

    I've learned that I still have a lot to learn...

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/bramble67/

  • In reply to bramble67:

    Sorry Bramble67

    Sorry somethingofadreamer

    :-)

    Hey farmer, farmer, put away the D.D.T now. Give me spots on my apples, but leave me the birds and the bees, please!

  • In reply to Anonymous:

    Hi Blackbird and Janet yes think lots of us used things we wish with hindsight that there had been alternatives but quite often think we used those chemicals in good faith not realising the awful consequences from some of them yet miraculasly most birds and animals seem to have recovered from the effects really well.The Peregrine perhaps a good example,thank goodness steps were taken in time. 

  • In reply to Sooty:

    Hi sooty

    its not your fault. you was only doing what you was told was best. mother nature is great at fixing some of our mistakes, that leaves us to do the rest.

    Hey farmer, farmer, put away the D.D.T now. Give me spots on my apples, but leave me the birds and the bees, please!

  • Hi,

    theoretically the best time to see birds in your garden should be first coupla hours of daylight ... BUT atm it's really cold then so the birds may be less active. As the weather improves and spring arrives earlier is often better.

    Some birds move off to roost earlier than others in the afternoon so the last hour of daylight may not be so productive :)

    Some species have a feeding circuit so they may visit your garden at the same time each day .

    S

    For advice about Birding, Identification,field guides,  binoculars, scopes, tripods,  etc - put 'Birding Tips'   into the search box

  • In reply to Janet:

    Sorry everyone my fault took the blog away from the original question no one else to blame.