Ragwort Frenzy

They may be very bad for horses but the bugs certainly love ragwort.  These were just some of what I spotted on a small clump at the weekend.

  • A lovely set Mike, particularly the feathery antennae in the first one. I don't know what any of the species are, byt I know some people who will know, and I'm sure they'll be along presently to put me out of my misery.... if not you out of yours too lol :o)
  • In reply to PimperneBloke:

    Yes I'm unsure of the moth and butterfly so any suggestions welcome. I initially thought moth was Silver Y but pattern is wrong and they don't seem to have feathery antenna, unlike this one. I thought the butterfly was a ringlet but they have spots even from the side so not sure.
    I'm pretty sure the happy couple are hover flies and the caterpillars are definitely cinnabar moth's which are pretty specific to ragwort.
  • Butterfly maybe a Small Heath...just a thought...but am as bad at IDs as PB am afraid ...You should add them to the Butterflies and Moths thread for a more experienced ID

    https://community.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/f/all-creatures/206393/butterflies-moths-2020/1314314#pifragment-4285=1

    (Pardon the Scottish Accent)

  • In reply to Linda257:

    Thanks for the suggestion, I'll give it a go - I'm still a newby here and struggling to find my way round the many different parts.
  • In reply to Mike Barker:

    No worries...nice to have you onboard...Mike

    (Pardon the Scottish Accent)

  • In reply to Mike Barker:

    It's often interesting to see what different insects turn up to plants but Ragwort is doing well at the moment as many others have gone to seed so the insects are concentrating on what's left.

    Mike Barker said:
    I'm pretty sure the happy couple are hover flies

    I thought so at first sight, so I can see where you are coming from ... but they aren't. There is a small group of flies known as Thick-headed flies (Conopidae) and a closer look suggests these are from that family.

    __________

    Nige   Flickr