Does a male rook feed a female away from the nest site?

I’ve been feeding a rook with a twisted leg for about 5 years now, he/she will let me stand beside them and will sit next to me and will come when I call. She comes 2/3 times a day. 

I call her Mori and I’ve never known if she was a male or female - she always comes alone. I always wondered was she alone because of her leg. However, today she arrived with a bigger bird and she was cawing at him and he was feeding her like a mother would do for a baby! 

She refused to fly down for her food but he was too nervous to approach her food box. She was getting really loud and impatient. But he was quite hesitant. I’m assuming she’s too old (at least 5) for it to be a mother/youngster relationship? Does this mean she’s likely to be female?

  • Food begging and feeding behaviours occurs between bonding and bonded adults - this may be the start of courtship
    not sure how you tell which is which unless you witness actual mating

    Cin J

  • In reply to Germain:

    Thanks so much! I’m just glad she’s found someone as she was always alone :)
  • Hi

    I saw an adult rook offering food to another last week in a field- I assumed it was pair bonding - but I have no info on it atm.

    S

    For advice about Birding, Identification,field guides,  binoculars, scopes, tripods,  etc - put 'Birding Tips'   into the search box

  • In my extremely very limited experience, adult birds feeding adult birds during the courtship season seems to be commonplace.

    I've seen blackbirds, blue tits and of course robins, feeding a prospective partner.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • I've seen Jays (who are in the same Corvid family as rooks)  courtship feeding too so seems quite a common practice in many species of birds during bonding/breeding season.    Glad to hear your friendly local rook may have paired up.    

    Very poor photo but this was a few years ago when I spotted the Jays courtship feeding.....

    _________________________________________________________________________

    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • I have watched our local Rookery quite closely over recent years to check breeding numbers and I've seen this behaviour a few times in the past and always presumed it to be part of pair bonding but I've never looked deeper into it so it may be just my take on it

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can

  • In reply to Seaman:

    Thank you all! Unfortunately she has come alone the last few days with no sign of her mate :(
  • In reply to Sorm:

    Sorm said:
    Thank you all! Unfortunately she has come alone the last few days with no sign of her mate :(

    Has she lost her mate, or is it she is incubating eggs while he is feeding?

    It could be as few weeks before you find out, unless you've seen something definite.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Mike B:

    Both arrived this morning and she was cawing away at him and flapping her wings so I’m hoping the courtship is still on the cards!
  • In reply to Sorm:

    Sorm said:
    Both arrived this morning and she was cawing away at him and flapping her wings so I’m hoping the courtship is still on the cards!

    You'll have to keep us posted now, you've whetted our appetites!

    Fingers crossed for a successful outcome.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler