Head the sound of this bird for the first time for many years

This is a bird that i heard for the first time for many years of a once very common migrant in the Spring every year in UK. But sadly not heard as often as at one time. Still arrive in the Spring in the UK every year in Spring! But in much smaller numbers sadly than used to be the case! At last I've managed to get this link to work. It's taken me more than 1 hour to get the link to work. All of us oldies will remember when the sound of this bird was heard widely in the Spring in the UK every year!

pic.twitter.com/ZCPPolCShP

Regards,

Ian.

  • Just to let you know I don’t think it’s converted into link, when you click on it it wont do anything
  • In reply to Zo Clark:

    Mayor problems again trying to get the link to work. But now ok. Try using a compiler if possible. I heard this bird in the distance away from Washington Wetlands. Washington Wetlands staff did this recording. I was taken aback but a nice surprise when this sound in the distance away from Washington Wetlands happened. Sound of this bird is not well heard on any iPhones or any mobile phone device. Can be heard better on iPads or preferably through a computer

    Regards,

    Ian.

  • In reply to THOMO:

    Iv just listened to it. That is lucky that they heard the Cuckoo. It used to be a common sound but it isn’t anymore. The Turtle Dove used to be a common sound in Spring aswell And is called the fastest declineing bird Species in the Uk. The Cuckoo is another one that used to be a common sound aswell. It makes me wonder if the Cuckoo might of inspired Cuckoo clocks since a cuckoo pops out of them

  • Clue the eggs of this bird are laid often in a Reed Warblers nest. The bird laying these is not the Reed Warbler. It really took me by surprise when I heard this bird. Even when this was far more common and far more often. Not many ever saw this bird. Even though I’ve been birdwatching since 1958. I only ever saw this bird twice with my own eyes. But when I used to on holiday with my Father to the Lake District I heard the sound of this bird widely as well as every spring all over Northumberland. Sadly that’s not the case any mote. This bird still arrives from Africa every Spring, but sadly in much smaller number. Listen to the recording and you will all recognise the sound of this bird. Whether young or old! But it was a pleasant and a nice surprise to hear the song/sound of this once very common bird you could here widespread all over the UK at one time every year in the Spring.

    Regards,

    Ian.

  • In reply to Zo Clark:

    Yes I used to hear the Sound of the Cuckoo every year. It was widespread just like the Turtle Dove. As I mentioned in this thread. I was walking down to the Saline Lagoon hide at Washington Wetland on the 12th May of this year when the song/sound of the Cuckoo started and then I posted on the Washington Wetlands Twitter account website asking if ant of staff had heard the Cuckoo as well. And it was then I was told that this short film where you could hear the sound of the Cuckoo. When I left the Saline Lagoon Hide the sound of the Cuckoo started again and later on in the afternoon on the same day the sound of the Cuckoo started in the distance when I was in the Hawthorn Wood Birdfeeder Hide. I’ve returned to Washington Wetlands a number of times since that day. But sadly no sign of the sound of the Cuckoo. But it was nice to hear. The Cuckoo still arrives every year in the UK but in much smaller numbers.

    Regards,

    Ian.

  • In reply to THOMO:

    Iv never heard the Turtle Dove or the Cuckoo unfortunately. The Turtle Dove started declining around the year 2000. I wasnt around before 1990s so wouldn’t of been around any time before that. Iv never heard the Turtle Dove call on tv or real life but For Cuckoos Ever since I was little I heard the Cuckoo in Cuckoo Clocks on Tv on Cartoons but not in real life. The very first time Iv ever seen a Cuckoo was in 2019 and it was in Wales in Camerthen on the way to a waterfall on a Mountain and it was  in the field next to the path. Iv never seen one in Gloucestershire or anywhere else. I don’t Know what year the Cuckoo started Declining Though. Was it before or was it after the Turtle Dove?

  • The Turtle Dove I think has declined far more rapidly.Cuckoos can still be heard in places at at all around England from time to tim The Turtle Dovs is now only seen in some area’s of Southern England. The two times I saw the Cuckoo and the was only 5 years ago on one of the monthly coach trips with my local RSPB Group and in Northumberland Now this might sound strange and indeed it was. But it was so long ago I can’t remember the year I saw my only other sighting of the Cuckoo. And it was on the top of one of the chimney pots in urban Gateshead and in the street where I lived and still live One day while I was out in the garden where I live I heard the sound of the Cuckoo and there it was on on the top of one of the chiminey pots in the roof of a house further along my street. The chiminey pots on all the roofs where the smoke from all the coal fires which most homes has at tgat time. The year I saw that Cuckoo in my street was either in the late 1959’s or early 1960’s. Not sure if the exact year as it was so very long ago!

    Regards,

    Ian.

  • Morning both,
    Not necessarily much use to you, but here in Switzerland too the Cuckoo is declining.

    A decade ago we would here it each Spring and be able to go up to meadowland to spot it, along with Red-backed Shrikes; but that faded to nothing over the years.

    But around a week ago I heard one calling from across the valley, at around 6:30 pm, and two were then sighted locally by reliable birders. I was quite surprised to hear one, up here above 800 m, but I hear (read) they're doing better in the uplands, while disappearing from the lowlands (again, here in Switzerland).

    We've been fortunate to have many good (even very close up) sightings of each of the morphs, so I suppose that's luck. Did a lot of (academic) reading on Cuckoos two years ago (for a work project), and apparently females specialize in mimicking **different** target species (i.e., laying eggs that resemble those of the target bird).

    And yes, Zo, cuckoo clocks: Being in Switzerland we have several, in the kitchen. Including one that plays a recording (sample) of a real Cuckoo calling from woodland.

    Good luck, both, with seeing one (or two) -
    Dave
  • We were lucky enough to see both male and female Cuckoos on the reserve yesterday. The female was the rufous morph plumage which I have not seen locally for years

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can