Not Northumberland #5

Well I'm afraid it had to happen. The predicted forecast for today was partially correct.... it said windy.... perhaps wet... and perhaps a smidge of sun..... well it wasn't wet!! Whilst it was murky this morning I took a few in the garden

Butter wouldn't melt....

"Mum, mum, mum, mum...……."

Mutter mutter mumble mumble "will you kids just give me five minutes peace...."

It's hard to believe that this....

Came from one of these weird things.....

Methinks his eyes are bigger than his belly...

And so are hers!!

The sun came out shortly before lunch, so I whipped up a little snackette and a drink to take with me, and battled my way bravely to the river through the storm force gales (I couldn't possibly let my devoted followers down after all)… also, it was described as a moderate breeze, but one man's breeze is another man's hurricane! Warning: Brew, snacks, reference materials all required!

A few steps into the woodland that runs alongside the river, I spotted a lovely speckled wood

And then Mrs Blackcap decided it was lunchtime (this is a theme that will recur throughout the walk!)

A lovely Robin stepped nicely into the light for me

And then a stripy thing crossed my path

1 (You can teach an old dog new tricks Tony )

A kestrel rose majestically from some trees just to my left, and then the wind caught it and it was about half a mile away before I'd even raised the camera!

The sparrow thought it was lunch time

And a reed warbler had something.... (don't you just love not realising you have a two-fer until you get home!)

There were plenty of demoiselle and damsels about

2

3 (Banded)

4

The first of many encounters with the heron

"And it was thiiiiis big..."

Stripy thing

5

Demoiselle?

6

Bee

7

A Pink Topped Damsel....very rare!!

8

There was a green veined white flittering around

And from beneath for Cin 

An Ar-mallard-a went by

Bee!?

9

A pretty accommodating reed warbler again

Mr and Mrs Banded Demoiselle enjoyed so haut cuisine.... funny, I never thought of them as insectivores...

A beetle!

10

Small Tortoiseshell

The heron got a fright....nearly as much as I did when he clattered off

More damsel action

11

12

A raggedy peacock was on the path, barely moved as I stepped over it

Another fly... not sure what the bubbles are?

13

Then we met the extraordinarily rare Gold Lame damsel, followed by the Bitey Gold Lame Damsel

14

Lily Beetle?

15

No clue what this is, a series of tubular stems that look to have been cut down

16

A million spotted ladybird

A Brimstone, I think...Underwing Overload for Cin, coz it didn't open it's wings whilst it was landed 

And finally another small tortoiseshell

I hope you've all enjoyed my week even half as much as I have, thanks for all your help with ID's, and for the banter and positive comments throughout.... But I might sneak another one in tomorrow lol

Stay Safe All

  • A brilliant 5th set PB with such an array of beauties; I love the demoiselles as not seen any yet and who could resist the gorgeous Reed Warblers. No favourites as love them all; thanks for all your efforts to bring some cheer to these long days.

    _________________________________________________________________________

    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • Good photos. The beetle labelled 'lily' is a cardinal beetle. Lily have black heads and are destructive in gardens. Cardinals are carnivorous but often confused with lily.
  • Another good haul. Wind often makes it difficult to photograph insects but it doesn't seem to have stopped you!!

    1 Early Bumblebee
    2,3,6,11,12,14 They are all Banded Demoiselles
    4,8 Blue-tailed Damselfly. You'll hate this, but females come in several colours including pink
    5 Hoverfly (one of the Drone Flies)
    7,9 Another Hoverfly (antennae very short = not a bee)
    10 One of the many Soldier Beetles
    13 Yes, it's a fly - maybe it's wings haven't formed yet/properly
    Yes, your green butterfly is a Brimstone.

    __________

    Nige   Flickr

  • Thanks for braving the gales to bring us some more goodies. It sure was windy today but warm settled weather is forecast for the weekend I think'
    I can see you are getting quite hooked on our insect friends. The one that caught my eye was No 8. I think this is a Blue-tailed Damselfly but an immature female variety known as rufescens hence the pink - nice. There's another Blue-tailed at No 4 which I think is called typica,
    I'll leave the hoverflies to Nige. but I think the one at No 5 is possibly one of the Eristalis
    Always good to get shots of Reed Warblers

    EDIT I see Nige beat me to it.

    ____________________________________________________________________

    Regards,Tony

    My Flickr Photostream 

  • Cracking photos again PB. It's good to see Small Tortoiseshell out and about, they have crashed so badly. Brimstones are rarely seen opened winged - same with Clouded Yellows for some reason.
    I do love Peonies - I have a bit of a track record for killing them sadly.
    CinJ

    Cin J

  • I am so glad you made it out PB...my evening wouldnt be the same without your array of wonderful pics..I really must go on a bug hunt one day...hopefully by then I shall be able to identify some and find something other than a midge

    (Pardon the Scottish Accent)

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    Nigel O said:
    females come in several colours including pink

    That's a bit stereotypical, Nige, isn't it...pink for a girl?? lol

    Nigel O said:
    Wind often makes it difficult

    I didn't have it at the time 

    Thanks for all the ID's, most appreciated 

  • In reply to Robbo:

    Thanks Robbo, it looked like a lily beetle we had in the garden last year, but I must have misremembered the head
  • In reply to TeeJay:

    Thanks, Tony. I've always liked the damsels and dragons, though not seen any of the bigger boys and girls yet
  • In reply to Linda257:

    Nahh, no need to identify them.... they guys and gals on here are more than happy to help 

    Glad I brighten your evenings