Sparrowhawk hunting in the snow......

So I was standing watching the birds in the snow waiting for the kettle to boil for a much needed cup of tea....

Aw those poor creatures out in the snow....

 a starling trying to get shelter and a bite to eat

tea is made then time to get back to work (fortunately for me that is at home). No sooner had I sat down then there was an almighty thud off the kitchen window. Birds tend to fly into my window alot even though I put things up at the window to try avoid it. I always dread going out the door afterward. 9 times out of 10 there is nothing there but today I didnt even get one foot out the door when I came face to face with a Sparrowhawk.....had to gently move and get my camera .....

I am glad it finally dragged its kill under the trees so I dont see it as I step out the door. 

  • guarding her lunch.....

  • She must had been at least an hiur and a half under the trees to then venture out and wipe her beak all over the snowy grass boasting a very full crop!

    Had to watch her take off only to make it to a tree a few metres away lol

  • Poor Pidge. I'm not an expert by any means, but I think that's a juvenile. I'm sure someone will know for sure.

    Unicum arbustum haud alit duos erithacos

    (One bush does not shelter two Robins)

    Zenodotus (3rd Century B.C.)

     

  • In reply to monkeycheese:

    monkeycheese said:
    Poor Pidge. I'm not an expert by any means, but I think that's a juvenile. I'm sure someone will know for sure.

    maybe (hopefully) I have a breading pair close by as this one was in the garden a couple of weeks ago.

  • That's a male

    Unicum arbustum haud alit duos erithacos

    (One bush does not shelter two Robins)

    Zenodotus (3rd Century B.C.)

     

  • In reply to monkeycheese:

    And possibly this is his Mrs...???

  • I'd say so. She will be a good deal larger.

    Unicum arbustum haud alit duos erithacos

    (One bush does not shelter two Robins)

    Zenodotus (3rd Century B.C.)

     

  • In reply to monkeycheese:

    And much noisier!! First noticed them last March and probably due to all the feeders in the garden it's a pretty easy meal for them
  • Quite often, the males will go for the smaller birds, like tits and finches, while the larger females will tackle bigger prey, like the pigeon, which is thought to avoid unnecessary competition between them.
    You're lucky to get to photograph them in your garden. Otherwise, they are extremely difficult to catch on camera

    __________

    Nige   Flickr

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    Oh I see! I have spent a number of hours with birds of prey...falconry lessons and hunting with the birds but nothing compares to seeing them wild in the garden. I usually hear them before I see them as the other birds go crazy when its sitting in the middle of the garden guarding its catch. I have seen many ....but today it allowed me to open the door and stand within 2 metres of it and take pictures . I am usually just standing at the kitchen window taking pics and vids