Hedgehog rescue this morning

out for a nice dry sunny morning walk this morning when my husband spots a little ball of prickles on the grass. Turns out it is the young hedgehog that comes round to feed every night in our garden! We decided to take them in and keep them warm and contact a rescue. The local ones were unfortunately full or very busy (as expected this time of year) however Prickles hedgehog rescue were brilliant they gave some good advice and even offered to take her in over winter. After we dropped them off turns out it is a little girl, fingers crossed she survives winter and we can pick her back up and release her back into the wild in the village. 

  • Well done getting wildlife help for the hoggie - when you said "them" was there more than the one female hoggie ? With weather getting colder and late in the season to hibernate it may not have survived without your intervention so great to hear it is getting the expert care to look after it through the winter. Hope you get to see the hoggie/s next springtime and release them back in your garden and their familiar surroundings.

    _________________________________________________________________________

    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • Well done on making another Hoggie safe and secure until it is big and well enough to be set free in the Spring.

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

  • Bravo/brava G.

    Prickles will, I guess, know (t)he(i)r chances and will only take them in if they deem it necessary.

    Sharp eyes; well done.

    Best regards -
    Dave
  • Just the one hoggie called it a ‘them’ as I didn’t know if it was a boy or girl. I’ve seen her every night on our camera in the food house and thought she wasn’t big enough. Thanks for the support all, she is very healthy and nothing wrong with her just wasn’t big enough to survive the cold weather over winter. I will keep you updated if she comes back in the spring and maybe post some pictures!
  • Well done G, wish her well overwinter ... my last two rescues were in vain (illness & injuries)but won't let that put me off ... still supplying food & water & watching keenly on trailcam!
    Seems to have been more late underweight youngsters rescued this year ... more peeps aware of their plight?

     

     2013 photos & vids here

    eff37 on Flickr

  • Oh no it is sad but without us trying they definitely wouldn’t have a chance so it’s good to see more people helping them. I think the warm autumn meant they had babies late so they can’t get the weight on in time for winter. My mum went to close her curtains this evening (while dark) and guess what? Another baby hog! We are going to try and get him tomorrow night and take him up to the rescue as well as he is just too little to survive winter. Otherwise nice and healthy not injuries or illness just underweight.

    I’ve read even if they hibernate at that weight they still won’t survive otherwise I’d leave them alone. If anyone has any tips on how to capture them with as little stress as possible it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks everyone so far for your kind words and help.
  • Sad news this morning, the hedgehog we tried to save yesterday has passed away in the crate at the rescue centre. We aren’t going to give up and will try and save this next little guy but we have found a rescue closer to home to cut down on the travelling, hoping this will make a difference.
  • Very sorry to hear that G.

    A number of years ago we helped out six autumn juveniles. Five hibernated successfully in our garden; we lost one almost immediately though.

    Sometimes they're too far gone and whatever care they receive isn't going to save them, sadly.

    Well done with the more local rescue centre... that will cut down the stress for the hog(s).

    Best regards -
    Dave
  • Good idea to find a more local rescue centre as stress is a big mortality factor for the Hoggies as well as the ever present internal parasite problem! I am lucky enough to have a dedicated wildlife vet & nurse to go to but is still a six mile car journey ... my preferred method is to snug the Hoggie into a large shoe box tucked in with a soft cloth or straw to keep it from rolling around!

     

     2013 photos & vids here

    eff37 on Flickr

  • That sounds like a good idea I might try and find a box big enough and put lots of padding in and some soft cloth for it to hide under if it wants to.

    Thanks for the reassuring words I’ve been racking my brain all morning wondering if it was something we did or they did.