Birds In Flight

  • In reply to turboman:

    turboman said:
    I have the Nikon D7100 which has the auto iso function, but never used it yet

    I'd be interested to hear how straightforward it is to use T-man.  Checking the user guide it seems.... a bit confusing, but that may be because I'm used to Canon's implementation (which is easy)

    It suggests Auto-ISO kicks in if the ISO setting you've chosen will result in an incorrect exposure (so acting as a safety net) when using P or A, but a more traditional use if using S or M (ie it simply chooses the correct ISO depending on your other settings).

    It would be good if it's usable as it always seemed a bizarre gap in functionality (and I've met too many novice users who are confused by having to set ISO as well as mess about with shutter speed and aperture).

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    Find me on Flickr / All about your camera - The Getting off Auto Index

  • In reply to Whistling Joe:

    Replying to my own post...

    I've gone back and found the thread I was referring to - it was discussing Birdiebeginner's D5100.  Checking out the userguide for that camera now, I can find the same sort of info that's in the D7100 guide.  So either I (and a couple of others) misread it at the time, or it is a feature enhanced by a later firmware update perhaps.  All very odd!  Anyway, at least we know it IS possible with Nikons, even if a bit non-intuitive to use

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    Find me on Flickr / All about your camera - The Getting off Auto Index

  • In reply to Whistling Joe:

    Interesting information regarding the Nikon gear; being a Canon user I had no idea about the possible difficulties of auto ISO on Nikon camera’s. It all seems to point to when using full manual mode, so would I be correct in thinking that there aren’t issues with auto ISO in shutter priority (S) mode?

    My bird photos HERE

  • In reply to Paul A:

    I've already added a link to the 'Getting off Auto' index at the beginning of this thread but with all the talk of shutter speeds and ISO settings, it may be of some help to have a look at WJ's thread specifically dealing with exposure (here).

    My bird photos HERE

  • In reply to Paul A:

    Paul A said:
    ....would I be correct in thinking that there aren’t issues with auto ISO in shutter priority (S) mode?

    I believe so

    <Geek mode on>

    It looks like the Auto-ISO feature on a Nikon is tied to the shutter speed, so that with S (shutter speed) and M (manual), Auto-ISO works how you'd expect, changing the ISO to maintain correct exposure depending on the shutter speed you've chosen.  In P (program) and A (aperture) modes however, it only alters the ISO you've chosen yourself IF the shutter speed the camera chooses falls below the value you've decided is the minimum you're happy with

    <Geek mode off>

    Compare that to Canon where Auto-ISO isn't buried in menus (where Nikon's is) - you simply click down from 100 to Auto.  Simples.  It also behaves the same way whatever camera mode you're using.

    So good news that the option exists - and for BiF shots especially, where shutter speed is key, looks like being straightforward in use.  At least I can go back to not fuelling the Canon vs Nikon debate when people ask what I recommend for someone buying their first DSLR* :-)

    * For what it's worth, my advice is always the same.  Handle the camera first - if it feels wrong, you won't use it & it becomes an expensive doorstop.  Don't get too hooked up on specs - every DSLR out there is better than 99% of photographers.  Realise you're buying a system, so think about what lenses you're likely to be after, that may drive the make of body (Pentax don't get full support from Sigma for example, so you won't get a 150-600mm zoom  for birding that fits a Pentax).  Finally, if money is tight, buy Canon or Nikon.  They're the most numerous and have the widest support from other manufacturers (eg Sigma, Tamron) and there's always loads of second hand kit available.

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    Find me on Flickr / All about your camera - The Getting off Auto Index

  • In reply to Whistling Joe:

    I had a read through my D7100 manual on Auto ISO, and found it rather confusing, still not sure how it works in various modes, but will give it a go. I usually use S or A mode depending on what I'm shooting, but more often than not A.

    Found this online WJ  https://www.nikonusa.com/en/learn-and-explore/a/tips-and-techniques/understanding-auto-iso.html  explains things a bit better I think.

    cheers  Terry

    my photo's here

  • In reply to turboman:

    Thanks Terry - yes, that article is a useful one.  Looks like I did manage to work it out correctly above :-)  Using A especially you'll have to be careful about checking the Auto-ISO settings each time you use the camera I reckon.  If you've set the minimum shutter speed to 1/100 whilst taking pics of the family with a kit lens, then swap to a long zoom for birds you're going to have trouble as it won't up the ISO for you until you get down to 1/100 sec (likely far too slow to handhold a 400 or 600mm lens).  Still, good for a day's birding ramble through different light levels when you're not lens swapping :-)

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    Find me on Flickr / All about your camera - The Getting off Auto Index

  • In reply to Whistling Joe:

    Thanks to Paul and everyone who has added to this thread, very interesting reading and must try this all out when home, so wish I had my canon with me now and not my little Panasonic tz80. Trying to capture birds in flight with it is so difficult but I will change single point focus to multi point to see if that helps. Thanks

    KR
    Tony

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/wherryman/

  • In reply to tony:

    Interesting my post above is timed at 9.19am when it's 22.20pm where I am currently watching an episode of Graham Norton from Nov 2016...........

    KR
    Tony

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/wherryman/

  • In reply to tony:

    some very interesting reading on here as usual. I must admit that i have been using manual shutter and apertures with Auto ISO as the preferred startup option for some time now with my Canon gear. Something that I don't think has been mentioned yet are the focussing options available on your camera.Several models in both camps have enhanced focussing options which can be very helpful for birds in flight so its really is useful to get to know what they are and what they can do for you - you do also need to learn how to change quickly from one to another.

    For instance some models offer an option whereby the focus is less likely to change when the target passes momentarily behind an object like a lamp post / bush etc. This is very useful when following your target waiting for the right shot such as barn Owl or SEO quartering a field or other slower moving targets so that even if he tagrget moves slightly out of the focus points you can catch te target up before focus changes. The down side of this option is that it can take a little longer to achieve focus in the first place.

    if your camera has the above option then it will also have the opposite - an option where something new in the focus zones takes precedence. this is extremely useful with faster moving birds which often pop out of your focus points  or when you are shooting larger flocks of birds or are trying to catch birds using a large (all) your focus points. The disadvantage is that focus will change rapidly onto something else but will also refind the target quicker if necessary.

    Lastly, consider the aids that might exist on your lens. Many lenses now have focus limiters so you can greatly improve focus response if you make use of that - no point having the lens hunting through the 0-30 feet range if the target is never going to come that near.

    These things always take some practice so that you have the confidence to be able to change mid shoot if your results are not as you would wish for. The beauty of digital is that you can practice as much as you want on species and situations that you normally wouldn't want to keep and process but which, on review, can show how your techniques improve.

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    Cheers,

    Bob

    My Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobs_retired_now/