Large raptor -white chest

  • In reply to Dave - CH:

    Thanks, Dave, I will pass on your comments on Bester.

    Kind regards, Ann

  • In reply to Gardenbirder:

    You're very welcome, Ann.
  • In reply to Seaman:

    So, Pete, here I am again.

    Your mention of "pale phase" caught my attention. 

    I've always thought that Common Buzzards have a pale, dark, or intermediate morphology, and not that they changed with age.

    I understand that juveniles differ from adults (and from sub-adults or "first adults", although Elon Musk will need to make us all immortal if I'm ever going to find the time to understand those categories), in shape and proportions, as well as in plumage. But I didn't think, say, youngsters were "pale" and became "dark" with age.

    I went back to my reference sources and can't find any reference to overall colouring changing dramatically over time (just plumage variation, and proportions, shape and size of the bird).

    As always, I'm happy to stand corrected (although I'd actually sit corrected, as it's a bit tricky to wind the desk up to its full height).

    So, when you say "pale phase"...?

    All the best - 

    Dave 

  • Interesting question, Dave. I hope Pete does not mind me butting in, but going to today's usual source, Mr Google, one of the zillions of sites offered listed 43 definitions of 'phase.' Keeping in mind that everything on the net can be incorrect, most definitions involved a 'phase' being a step along the way of a linear or circular process, as in your question. But the definitions below seem to allow for Pete's usage as well; here are a few of the 43 from this link, not all of which offer examples (and the last one offered intrigued me, must investigate further--possibly in my next life!): www.yourdictionary.com/phase
    ---Any of the ways in which something may be observed, considered, or presented; aspect; side; part:
    'A problem with many phases.'
    ---That which is exhibited to the eye; the appearance which anything manifests, especially any one among different and varying appearances of the same object.
    ---Any appearance or aspect of an object of mental apprehension or view:
    'The problem has many phases.'
    ---(genetics) A haplotype.
    ---(genetics, informal) To determine haplotypes in (data) when genotypes are known.
    ---(obsolete) Passover.

    Kind regards, Ann

  • In reply to Dave - CH:

    Maybe phase is the wrong term but it is how we often talk of them among our own group maybe morph would be a better term and I don't mean the little plasticine fellow that was on tv

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can

  • In reply to Seaman:

    Not wrong, Pete, but the less frequent usage I imagine and perfectly acceptable, at least until an expert in the English language comes on to tell me I am telling porkies.  Which reminds me, have any of you heard of a book titled Anguish Languish

    (Apologies to all for diverting the direction of this thread but the essence seems to be that Buzzards are extremely variable.)

    Kind regards, Ann

  • Interesting Ann, having been married to an ex language teacher for nearly 49 years I might carefully pass that in her direction.

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can

  • Pete, are you referring to the book I mentioned?

    Kind regards, Ann

  • Morning,

    Good points, Ann.

    First, it was not my intention to imply that Pete used "the wrong word". Only to check that Buzzards have types, and that they don't "change type" over time (even if juveniles and adults are markedly different birds). I'm always open to having my "received wisdom" revised, or confirmed.

    Definitions of phase:

    "A genetic or seasonal variety of an animal's coloration" (OED) (emphasis mine).

    "an individual or subgroup distinguishably different in appearance or behavior from the norm of the group to which it belongs" (Merriam--Webster (Collegial) (so, the Unabridged) (emphasis mine).

    So, no problem at all with "phase", except that it might convey the idea of a cycle or progression over time. (But probably only to people who know as little as I do.)

    Mr. Google: Something along these lines was doing the rounds a few years ago on social media:

    1968: "Shhhh! The Military--Industrial Complex is listening."

    2018: "Hey, Military--Industrial Complex: What's the recipe for pancakes!?"

    Conclusion: Pete's "phase" = my "morph". (But not the little plasticine guy from the TV.)

    All the best - 

    Dave 

  • In reply to Gardenbirder:

    Yes It wad Ann sorry if it wasn't clear it was the end of a hard day

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can