I started my day at the visitor centre before making my way down to Ellins Tower.

The scenery is breathtaking I never tire of it, I was to spend the day in the tower with Charlotte our Assistant People Engagement Officer, our job was to meet and greet people. We get many visitors many of which are on holiday, others are mainly people who have come specially to see the nesting sea birds.

On approaching the tower the lighthouse comes into view.

Finally I am at the tower,

It is early and our visitors have not yet arrived.

We set up the equipment before Charlotte sets to and cleans the windows!

It is not long before the tower is full of people wanting to take advantage of the views. From here we can see the nesting Guillemot's and Razorbill.

As you can see from the pictures above we had several thousand nesting birds. From lunch time there was not a single Guillemot or Razorbill to be seen on the cliff. We could still see a few on the sea but the majority had gone way out to sea to feed.

I had said in my title that it is a small world. I got talking to the couple in the picture below, it turns out that they had come from Arizona! I always marvel at the way in which visitors find South Stack, these are mainly from within the UK, but to find us all the way from America is another thing altogether. They were quite impressed with our reserve.

Out of the window I noticed a Rock Pipit very close to the tower, when we spot anything worthy of the attention of our visitors we inform them. Unfortunately they were more interested in looking at the puffins on the sea outside of the tower.

I realise that it is not a very good picture, it was taken with my compact camera through glass.

Suddenly I noticed some very special pets in the corner. They were calling out to children just wanting to be cherished. Wildlife needs the children to protect it, they are the future. One of these soft toys is given to a youngster when they become a member of the RSPB.

I read an article in the RSPB magazine 'Birds'. It basically said that our land used to be vast countryside dotted with hamlets and villages with the odd city here and there. Now we have huge sprawling cities and large developments with bits of countryside dotted here and there. If we do not protect our wildlife the developers will completely drive it away. There are many children who live in the cities who have never seen the real countryside and its wildlife.

I have now finished my day and make my way back to the Visitor Centre.

Anonymous