Intro from Wes

Extra pressures and working arrangements in our reserves team brought by Covid19 has made fitting in some regular blog writing time tricky. So we are delighted to have had an offer from Martin to help us out. We often bump into him (if you can still bump into people from 2m away!?) at the reserves, searching for the best light or telling tales of godwits escaping peregrines or impromptu starling murmurations. We love his posts that pop up on social media - not just the stunning photos - but the way he describes the experience of enjoying his wildlife encounters, often 'through the lens'.

This week is an introduction, we can't wait to see what images and musing come our way in the coming months:  

Hello,

My name is Martin Campbell and I have been requested to do a regular post to the RSPB website/community.

I have been interested in birds for as long as I can remember, from the days of primary school, roaming the County Durham countryside looking or Herons, Kingfishers, Treecreepers, Yellowhammers and the like.

Sitting on the fence - Merlin at Marshside 

At around the age of 18-20, I did several stints of voluntary wardening at RSPB reserves including Leighton Moss, Coombes Valley and Insh Marshes. Then work got in the way, though during my 36 years as a primary school teacher, I did a lot of nature-based work with children, often using my own photographs. In recent years, this included the RSPB’s Big Schools Birdwatch.

Cattle egret in flight - Marshside

I am now three years retired and have loved having the time to spend on nature photography. Since lockdown, my link with RSPB Marshside has flourished as it’s one of my nearest open spaces. I am currently posting regularly on Facebook (West Lancashire Nature Notes) and this is definitely raising the profile of the reserve.

  

Hare in the grass - Marshside 

Hopefully my photographs will highlight how underrated this place can be as a nature reserve.

Black-headed gull feeding - Marshside 

Teal in the sun at Marshside 

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