The past week has been dominated by ffridd surveys. But what is ffridd? Well, ffridd is the Welsh name used to describe the habitat margin between the lowlands of good grazing and the moorland. It is generally slopes dominated with bracken with scattered trees and potentially scattered gorse and heather. Due to its nature of being the margin between two habitats it can be very variable and consist of different vegetation types and density depending on location and any management taking place, typically grazing.

Lake Vyrnwy ffridd in March by Gavin Chambers

Ffridd can support a good range of species including whinchat, ring ouzel, tree pipit, fritillary butterflies and ivy-leaved bellflower, all of which we get on the reserve. Given the three bird species mentioned are all Red Listed it highlights the importance of this habitat. So bird surveys taking place this year are aimed at understanding what our current population levels are on ffridd and can be used in the future to see how management that will take place in these areas has affected bird numbers.

Male whinchat on ffridd by Gavin Chambers

Good places to see ffridd and its associated species are along the Dinas Mawddwy road and Bala road by bridge over river.

Recent Sightings

With the arrival of some warmer weather the final summer migrants have arrived back. This includes whitethroat, garden warbler, spotted flycatcher and swift screaming over the village. Insects have been more noticeable with the first green hairstreak seen on the moors, green tiger beetle and some interesting looking nomad bees which look a lot like wasps!

Nomad bee by Gavin Chambers

Other highlights have been an adult hobby low over the village on 12 May and an osprey circling high over the Dinas Mawddwy road on 13 May.

Adult hobby over Llanwddyn by Gavin Chambers

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