Hello Again....

  • In reply to Gardenbirder:

    Do you have any suggestions for dealing with Equisetum?

    Hi Ann,
    Great to speak again.
    It's a little late to talk about 'Horse Tail' now but you will be pleased to know that my garden also has it and in our back field it grows four foot tall!!! I feel your pain!!
    I will pop back on tomorrow at a more sensible hour to discuss further.
    Best regards
    Higgy

  • Thanks, Higgy, but there's no rush to reply--it probably will not reappear for a couple of months or more. Or at least we did not notice it last year until well after we began living here in April.

    Kind regards, 

    Ann

  • Just bumping up this thread. Hope all is well with you and yours, Higgy; I've been wondering what you're doing these days..

    Kind regards, 

    Ann

  • Thanks for bumping this thread up, Ann. It's great to see what the lovely Higgy's been up to!

    I must confess I'd like to have an idea of how big a hebe topiaria will grow. I'd got it in a little pot (well, the one I bought it in) and I'd like to have an idea of whether I just need to put it into a slightly bigger pot or whether I need to plant it in the ground and watch it run riot.

    Our herring gulls are red listed birds.  Think about that the next time you hear some flaming idiot calling for a cull of them.

  • In reply to Clare:

    Hope Higgy sees this and has time to respond. I'm not much of a gardener, Clare, and I've killed off a few plants in pots over the years although most have survived. I do know that many gardeners do say that most plants are happier in the ground than in a pot, unless, of course, they are tropical plants and might suffer in winter here in the UK unless protected! In the meantime, here is what the RHS says about your Hebe: "Suggested planting locations and garden types:
    Flower borders and beds Ground Cover Banks and Slopes Coastal Cottage & Informal Garden Rock Garden City & Courtyard Gardens Patio & Container Plants" Sounds like it is happy in either a pot or the ground. Here's their link: www.rhs.org.uk/.../Details

    Kind regards, 

    Ann

  • Yeah, I read that - but the only thing it didn't mention is how big it'll grow. I've yet to decide if it's going into the ground or a pot outside - but if it will be a pot I'd like an idea of how big a pot.

    Our herring gulls are red listed birds.  Think about that the next time you hear some flaming idiot calling for a cull of them.

  • Hi Clare, I have had and still have a Hebe (different types) and they were/are in the ground. We have very sandy soil and where this one is and when the sun comes round to the west it is in the shade. I got it from a friend a couple of years ago, plonked it in the ground, gave it a good watering, spoke nicley to it, and asked it to grow! To my amazement it took root and last year and this had beautiful purple flowers. It is roughly 2 feet highl and deep and 3 feet high. I would think if you put it in a pot, then a large 18 inch planter. I will try and get a photo and add it here, just to give you an idea.

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

  • In reply to Clare:

    Clare, I think the usual idea is that if the plant is not going into the ground that you choose a new pot which is only very slightly bigger than the one it is in at the moment. Most plants seem to do better if they are only gradually moved into larger and larger pots, and if they are not moved more often than once a year. As for ultimate size, the RHS site says it is compact, whatever that means! You could always put it into an inexpensive plastic pot which is slightly bigger than the one it is in now until you find the final size of the Hebe (but I expect you knew that!)

    Kind regards, 

    Ann

  • In reply to Clare:

    Clare, this site says in 5 -10 years the Hebe topiaria can grow to maturity, max up to 0.5 m high and max 1 m spread: www.shootgardening.co.uk/.../hebe-topiaria

    Kind regards, 

    Ann

  • In reply to Gardenbirder:

    Gardenbirder said:
    I think the usual idea is that if the plant is not going into the ground that you choose a new pot which is only very slightly bigger than the one it is in at the moment. Most plants seem to do better if they are only gradually moved into larger and larger pots, and if they are not moved more often than once a year. As for ultimate size, the RHS site says it is compact, whatever that means! You could always put it into an inexpensive plastic pot which is slightly bigger than the one it is in now until you find the final size of the Hebe (but I expect you knew that!)

    Thanks, Ann - that's very helpful.  I'm very new to this gardening business and my knowledge could be easily written on our Prime Minister's conscience.

    Our herring gulls are red listed birds.  Think about that the next time you hear some flaming idiot calling for a cull of them.