sparrows

No shortage of sparrows in my village I counted 31 the other day on my hedge along with bluetits as well. Shrtage?

Lets help and protect

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    Hi Graham

    Good thread!

    We are lucky to have had Sparrows in all the houses that we have lived in

    At the moment we have a small narrow front garden area.  It is paved and has some small plants in the middle point, and a mixture of bushes on the outer perimeter.  There are Holly bushes, a mixture of other scrubs, and small trees all tangled up toigether.  So this makes a great Sparrow home.  Lots of dense foliage as they like to stay safe from 'preying'  Sparrowhawks.

    Currently we have a small flock living in the bushes in our front garden, and we can see all of the activity while sitting comfortably in our front room.  It is a like having a large TV with a film about Sparrows on the go all day and all night,  Great viewing, and all for nothing.

    Hopefully myself and my OH will get some good pictures of them in the coming months,  They are getting used to us now (we just moved 2 months ago) and we will entice them with some seeds as much as we can.  We have placed a window feeder on our front room window,  They are shy about feeding at the moment but I am sure that they will want to feed when the cold weather starts up.

    I counted 12 of them in all,  The little male bird is enjoying his evening nap quite high up in the bush,  I can see him there about 7 in the evening,  Then he joins up with his group once more.  It is interesting to watch.

    I like Sparrows as they are very endearing little birds and I never tire of their antics.

    When I manage to get some good pictures, I will post them on the Gallery here

    Regards

    Kathy and Dave

     

     

     

     

  • In reply to Anonymous:

    Our Sparrows are very slowly increasing in their numbers. We had one pair when we first moved in and now we have three pairs. They seem to be very bad parents and tend to abandon the fledglings once they have left the nest.

     

    This pair were making an incredible din but Mum and Dad didn’t take any notice. Unfortunately we found them both dead by the end of the day.

    Build it and they will come.

  • In reply to Wildlife friendly:

    Oh, that is so tragic as they look utterly adorable.

    Squirrel

    The necessity of bird-watching is a really good reason for avoiding all forms of housework.

    The dust will still be there tomorrow - the birds may not be!

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Squirrel:

    I agree Squirrel they are very adorable.

    Beautiful picture Wildlife Friendly

    Oh dear poor little mites. 

    I never realised that Sparrows could be so irresponsible for their own off spring. 

    Nature can be so brutal at times

    Regards

    Kathy and Dave

  • In reply to Anonymous:

    We also have regular sparrows, quite a little flock at the moment who are presumably some of this year's fledglings. They like to hop about in a somewhat overgrown rosebush outside our window. The other day I'd swear they were deliberately teasing our cats, who were sat on the indoor windowsill looking out. The same couple of birds kept hopping onto the sill outside, right where the cats were sat, then back into the bush. They did this at least 3 times!

    Make the boy interested in natural history if you can; it is better than games [Robert Falcon Scott]

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Cartimandua:

    I think Sparrows are just inquisitive, and they like to watch what is going on around them.

    Hope that you cats are not to put out by their antics.

    Regards

    Kathy and Dave

    Cartimandua said:

    We also have regular sparrows, quite a little flock at the moment who are presumably some of this year's fledglings. They like to hop about in a somewhat overgrown rosebush outside our window. The other day I'd swear they were deliberately teasing our cats, who were sat on the indoor windowsill looking out. The same couple of birds kept hopping onto the sill outside, right where the cats were sat, then back into the bush. They did this at least 3 times!

     

     

  • In reply to Anonymous:

    We're lucky enough to have a healthy local sparrow population.  They seem to send an advance party of two or three birds to the feeders before larger numbers arrive.  I really enjoy watching them in our garden hedges.

    Warning!  This post contains atrocious spelling, and terrible grammar.  Approach with extreme edginess.

  • In reply to Heron77:

    We're also lucky in that way and the local Sparrow Hawk is also happy!

    The the time spent waiting for the bath tub.

     

    What am I saying! Nobody waits and where did all the water go?

    They may be common, in my garden, but they provide most of the entertainment! 

    John

    For viewing or photography right place right time is everything. I'd rather be in the right place with poor kit than have the best kit and be in the wrong place.

  • In reply to Highland McHale:

    Oh John... that is superb. Pic #1 reminds me of a roman emperor taking a bath with the 4 handmaidens in attendance - and even what looks like a rose petal floating to fragrance the water. As for the one at the back in pic #2 - looks positively grumpy! What a lovely sight. Thanks so much...

    Squirrel

    The necessity of bird-watching is a really good reason for avoiding all forms of housework.

    The dust will still be there tomorrow - the birds may not be!

  • In reply to Squirrel:

    John, I LOVE these two photos!  i had a good laugh at the last one.  Sparrows are such lovely little birds.  At the moment,  (early spring here) we seem to be visited by the bachelor group!  Lots of little black bibs, and not a hen to be seen.

    Smiles, Jan.