Bird feed with Aniseed

  • In reply to Kezmo:

    Aniseed is indeed loved by many birds - but a word of warning is to use it sparingly! Too much will have the opposite effect & they will avoid it like the plague. We tend to mix aniseed feeds with equal parts of usual feed & that is enough. The squirrels love it too so we even put a little in the squirrel feeders

    One Life - Live It!!

  • In reply to Valmc:

    Great photo Kezmo!! Good for you!! It's great news and I hope he will become a more regular visitor!

    I too have noticed an aniseed smell from some of the bird food I've bought. Personally I don't like it! Fortunately (for me), my regular suppliers doesn't seem to use it in their mix!!

    "All weeds are flowers, once you get to know them" (Eeyore)

    My photos on Flickr

  • In reply to nestbox:

    nestbox said:

    http://www.valupets.com/pets/wild-bird-food,-peanuts-and-fat-balls/wild-bird-food-spring-and-summer-15kg/25055.html

    Hi

    I found this link with regards to aniseed in birdfood. Also you can buy aniseed oil which you can use to flavour you existing birdfood.

    Graham

    I have wanted to ask, since following nestbox's link to the birdfeed containing aniseed, is that it is advertised as a Spring/ Summer feed, does that make the feed inappropriate as an Autumn / Winter feed ? The advert talks of building up the birds after winter.

  • In reply to Brenda H:

    Hi Brenda, I have just read the details in the link Graham supplied and it certainly does seem as though it is specifically for spring and early summer. At this time of year it might be worth contacting them before purchasing as they may have an alternative, being an autumn/winter mix.

    The necessity of bird-watching is a really good reason for avoiding all forms of housework.

    The dust will still be there tomorrow - the birds may not be!

  • In reply to Squirrel:

    This is something we've had similar reports of in the past. I can only guess that there must be some evolutionary mechanism tied in with this response to the seed. Perhaps its the odour being associated with the food?

    There are 3 (that i know of) plant species belonging to the carrot family which produce a strong aniseed smell - Sweet cicley, Fennel and Dill, they all are known to attract moth and butterfly larvae which will also therefore attract birds. Certainly once the flowers have been pollinated sparrows and finches wil readily take the seeds. So I assume its this kind of hardwiring to recognising it as an efficent food source.  

  • In reply to LloydScott:

    That's really interesting Lloyd! Thanks!

    "All weeds are flowers, once you get to know them" (Eeyore)

    My photos on Flickr

  • In reply to Rockwolf:

    Hi all,

    Thanks so much for all your replies - The feed in question has all been eaten up now so they are back to the normal food I give which is an all year round feed topped up with special extras that I put in so all my birds should be back to being rather happy - hope they don't suffer any withdrawal symptoms from the aniseed oil :~) 

    BTW haven't seen the woodpecker since....ho hum I live in hope.

    Regards

    Kerry

     http://www.flickr.com/photos/kezmo6310/