Typically, how many baby Blue Tits survive?

Hi,

We put up a bird box with a camera and much to our delight last week the Blue Tits that have made a nest in it hatched their eggs.

Of the eight eggs laid, seven hatched and the chicks have been tended to by both parents for the week and seemingly growing (with tiny discernible feathers coming through)

Sadly, overnight 4 passed away leaving only 3.
Is this normal or is the cold wet weather making things worse?

While I understand this is nature's way, I want to manage the expectations of our kids, so typically what is the survival rate of baby blue tits to fledging?

Also is there anything we can be do to giving them the best chance? (we have some bird feeders with seeds/suet pellets but have ben leaving them to it! I'm sure my kids would be more than willing to do some bug hunting!)

Many thanks for any information

KK

  • As written a few times recently, 2021 will go down as a fairly catastrophic breeding season for garden birds IMO. As you said, weather has not been suitable. Too dry, too cold then too wet. Mostly the former two though. Caterpillars will have been killed off in large numbers due to frosts. Many nests of long tailed tits, blue tits and great tits will have failed, or are failing due to lack of natural food.

    As to how many blue tits normally fledge, depends on where the nest is. Garden locations, I believe, will have a much lower net output to woodland ones. Lack of natural food and large volume of predation by cats, crows & magpies etc.

  • In reply to Robbo:

    Thanks for the info.
    Here's hoping that with fewer mouths they'll do better.

    Are magpies going to be a problem? We've been 'training' the neighbours cat to go around the front but a few magpies visit one of our feeders!
  • Magpies aren't a problem while youngsters are in the box. Many get picked off within days of leaving the safety of them though. Magpies are amongst the most efficient at tracking down young birds.