Peregrine?

  • In reply to Dave - CH:

    Yeah it’s pretty good sometimes living in a rural village, there’s lots of churches nearby and one of them had nesting peregrines last year. I generally see them during breeding season but otherwise not much for the rest year. Won’t be long until I see my first hobby this year either (I live a two minute walk away from an old opencast coal mine that turned into a nature reserve). I wish I could see peregrines as much as you do though!
  • In reply to ellis187:

    Peregrines in a church. That must be interesting. Ours are all half way up cliffs in the middle of nowhere. I think I've permanently changed the shape of my behind with all the sitting on rocks I've done these last few months.

    They urban nest here too, but the only attempt I know of locally (relatively locally) failed due to the presence of gulls.

    Careful what you wish for though. Having them nesting close by leads to a lot of fretting about the nest (or it does for me, anyway).

    Good luck with Hobby sightings. Last saw one last spring, hunting over the Doubs river on the Franco-Swiss border. Pretty spectacular.

    Might consider swapping a Hobby sighting for our current Honey Buzzard arrivals. Now that's another bird I'm always happy to see.

    All the best -
    Dave
  • In reply to Seaman:

    You're kidding Pete. Some of you lot know more about birds in your sleep than I will ever know.

    I'm like Ellis. A bloke with bins. Only I bought the bins a few years before Ellis bought his. And I was very fortunate to have advice and, above all, patience and encouragement from certain posters (those no longer on here, seymouraves, Tony, yourself, and pretty much every one of the knowledgeable, patient, helpful lady Community members (why are all the women on here so nice?)) when I first posted on here.

    This spring has, though, involved many, many hours of observations, of our local breeders, the odd interloper, returned offspring from previous years, and other sites (we spent a few days at sites farther afield, for an acquaintance who is off down south vulture watching). 

    Based on observations, we were invited (a few years ago) to be members of the regional monitoring group (three species, Peregrines being one of them). And this year we've tried to contribute a bit more. Do what we can, you know?

    Still trying to get to the bottom of some of the things we've seen. Maybe I should write to Ed?  :-)

    I wish "your" falcons the best of luck. I find it very sad when they fail, having arrived with so much promise and so full of life. Fingers crossed.

    It's a funny thing to spend half a day watching a nest, always hoping that the male comes back with prey. And then you think, well, I'm hoping that he kills something. The Peregrine falcon approach to Action Philosophy.  ;-)

    All the best - 

    Dave 

  • I am a follower of Peregrines here in UK Dave & we are so lucky be inundated with very many successful Peregrine nests on our cathedrals, churches, highrise buildings & cliffs! Many of these have live streaming cameras fitted so that we can follow progress each season, some even broadcast all year round! Currently able to watch many chicks progress to fledging plus postings of vids & pics on Twitter every day! Also watchpoints set up by some sites with bins & spotting scopes available for folk to watch live action!

    Must increase chances of birdwatchers spotting one flying anywhere in our skies?  I think Ellis's pic is a Peregrine!

     

     2013 photos & vids here

    eff37 on Flickr

  • In reply to WendyBartter:

    Morning Wendy; nice to hear from you. Didn't know you were a Peregrine follower.

    Yes, I've kind of become aware of that pretty much from the various dedicated threads in this Community. To be honest with you, I've almost never looked at the webcam footage because (i) my work involves enough screen time already, and (ii) I know that I'd just sit and watch it until I developed malnutrition and Mrs. CH would have to scrape me off the chair with a spatula and drive me to A+E.

    I agree though that great work is being done. Here, we're a little more... secretive about it all. Although I do know of a local site with fixed bins available.

    Last year, we were up north of here and came across two previously unrecorded nesting pairs, which was a find. I talked to a young lad who was staying in the same farm (the birds were active close to the farm) as us, and gave him a few Peregrine facts, just to get him curious. Who knows, one day he might be a Peregrine follower too. I hope so.

    Re Ellis's pics and film, I would describe the flight action as stiff, and the single, strong, almost mechanical beats would, in my experience, rule out some other smaller falcons. The beats appear, to me (old eyes, I know), to come from the shoulder, which all---in my limited experience---say Peregrine to me.

    Spotting scopes available for folk to watch? Where I come from, they'd be gone overnight.  ;-)

    All the best - 

    Dave 

  • The webccams are a boon to the housebound which I am now! Equipment for designated days only & strictly monitored & removed at end of watchpoint session!

     

     2013 photos & vids here

    eff37 on Flickr

  • In reply to Dave - CH:

    Dave I find it even sadder when the nest failure is due to human interference such as intentional disturbance or physical attacks on the bird. This is usually aimed at the male him being the main provider in many cases.
    Wendy, I think it is great that official watch points are set up so Joe Public can see these magnificent raptors and nesting on church or office buildings is a lot safer than trying to breed in their natural habitat. There are a great number of historical breeding sites where Peregrines are just not allowed to breed because their presence interferes with others idea of sport. At this time of year raptor field workers spend a lot of time visiting such sites but usually they are empty. That's me off on my little rant again sorry to have hijacked the thread again.

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can

  • In reply to WendyBartter:

    Saves on spatulas...

    ;-)
  • In reply to Seaman:

    Pete, I agree. And it can even be... "carelessness". 

    Here, cliffs are closed to climbers when nests are IDed. 

    This year, I chatted with a young couple who had just climbed a closed cliff, their route almost certainly taking them right through the occupied nest.

    To commence the climb, they attached their kit to the first fixing point, to which is padlocked a foot-long plaque that tells them, in two languages, the dangers to the birds and the fact that they, in theory, risk a fine of around £16k if they ignore the restriction.

    But basically, this couple just didn't care.

    Sad, I think.

    Our leisure trumping the birds' survival.

    My co-rant over.

    Dave 

  • In reply to Dave - CH:

    There's always one,or two, who really believe rules and regulations do not concern them.We found that out during the years Chris and myself did volunteer warden duty in the Dale but that could start another rant

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can