Owl calls (Tawny and Little): Mnemonics only

Afternoon,

Just spent a week south, with a lot of close-up owl action.

Anyone out there familiar with Tawny and Little Owl calls, and prepared to advise? (Mnemonics only; no recordings (of the calls in question).)

All the best - 

Dave 

  • Also have a look at Bird Songs & Calls, link below.

    https://www.british-birdsongs.uk/

    It may be worth book marking this, and the link sent by Sunny Kate to your warbler question.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Mike B:

    Thanks again Mike, but the Little Owl calls it gives are fairly standard, and the Tawny calls too. They don't, for example, include the Tawny's vibrophone courtship call.

    Will check out The Sound Approach on Monday, and see if they're a bit more comprehensive.

    I've also e-mailed the local verifier: We'll see what he comes up with.

    All the best -
    Dave
  • In reply to Dave - CH:

    Morning.
    No joy at The Sound Approach. The excellent, detailed piece on Little Owls cites five basic calls, which break out into 22 variations (all this from another work).
    Our Little Owl was making coffee.
    Guess I'll have to keep looking...

    Thanks, again, for the link Mike.

    All the best -
    Dave
  • In reply to Dave - CH:

    Dave, you're very welcome.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • Just ran the sound past a (genuine) expert. His take, "advanced Little Owl science".

    So, still looking...
  • In reply to Dave - CH:

    An interesting thread no less. There has been talk of "local dialects" in birds and animals, and while I'm not clever enough to argue one way of another, it does make sometimes make you wonder whether it is an April Fool style mention, or if there really are local dialects.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Mike B:

    I've heard that theory advanced by quite respectable scientists, Mike (noting that not all scientists are respectable).

    And have even experienced it myself (at my own, very, very modest level), although I have to pretty much change countries to discern the difference.
  • In reply to Dave - CH:

    One lesson I learned a long time ago, life is not black and white as the Victorians would have us believe, there  are many shades of grey in-between. After all, it was thought animals don't have emotions or feel pain, which we know today is not the case.

    So I'm happy to keep an open mind.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • For those interested, having apparently exhausted all available avenues, including the UK's Hawk and Owl Trust, I had the identity of the bird confirmed yesterday by the excellent Magnus Robb of the equally excellent The Sound Approach (the organization's Paul Morton had hooked us up).

    Athene noctua "cucumiau".

    A very similar call can be heard at the beginning of recording CD1-64 at https://soundapproach.co.uk/species/cucumiau/.

    As Magnus pointed out, "cucumiau" is a version of the "pop-pop-PEE-oo" call we heard in Tuscany.

    Those interested in regional vocalization variations in the "same bird" will enjoy the (very informative) piece.

    I'll, of course, be making a donation to support their work.

    All the best - 

    Dave