Help needed....again

Spotted this one on the heathery lower slopes of Morven hill in Aberdeenshire. Appreciate any help identifying this,

  o

  • Stonechat, I think

    Cin J

  • What Cin said.... And a beauty at that :o)
  • My first thought was stonechat also

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • thanks Cin and all. I was a bit unsure when i first looked at the Stonechat in the book I have (RSPB Handbook of Scottish Birds) as it kinda looks like a mix of a juvenile male, a male and a female :) to me anyway. I understand the head is less black in the autumn so could be an autumn male?? any thoughts?

    This bird identification business is much harder than i first thought :) glad there is a forum like this to help the newbies.
  • In reply to Garry Hunter:

    Garry Hunter said:
    thanks Cin and all. I was a bit unsure when i first looked at the Stonechat in the book I have (RSPB Handbook of Scottish Birds) as it kinda looks like a mix of a juvenile male, a male and a female :) to me anyway. I understand the head is less black in the autumn so could be an autumn male?? any thoughts?



    This bird identification business is much harder than i first thought :) glad there is a forum like this to help the newbies.

    With some birds, even the more experienced have trouble. The best thing to do is enjoy what you do and as time progresses, you'll soon learn bit by bit rather than trying to cramp everything in one go.

    Added to that, even in books some pictures/diagrams can look different to your photo, and if the light hits at a totally different angle yet again, it can create more fun. What you will find here is a friendly helpful group of people more than happy to help with a smile.

    I'm sure the RSPB Handbook of Scottish Birds is a good book, even though it may be tailored to Scotland more than England or Wales, but the vast majority of species will be found across the UK. Likewise many of the RSPB's other books, a couple of which I have.

    A book I find helpful is the DK Pocket Nature Wildlife Of Britain. When you scan the index it often shows more than one page number for a particular species, which may seem confusing, but in fact it can be beneficial, because the extra pages show other species that are similar in appearance and allowing you to make an educated guess.

    https://www.dk.com/uk/book/9781405328609-pocket-nature-wildlife-of-britain/

    Another book I find helpful, is Collins Complete Guide - British Wildlife, it has some very nice clear pictures.

    https://collins.co.uk/products/9780007236831

    With both books, there are other books devoted totally to birds and will have more species rather than trying to cramp plants and other animals in to a limited space, but I like them because they are general wildlife books.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • Thanks Mike, We'll definitely keep at it. The more you stop and look at mother nature the more she rewards your efforts. Appreciate the book recommendation, "Pocket Nature Wildlife of Britain: A Unique Photographic Guide to British Wildlife"... added to basket and arriving tomorrow. :)
  • In reply to Garry Hunter:

    Garry Hunter said:
    Thanks Mike, We'll definitely keep at it. The more you stop and look at mother nature the more she rewards your efforts. Appreciate the book recommendation, "Pocket Nature Wildlife of Britain: A Unique Photographic Guide to British Wildlife"... added to basket and arriving tomorrow. :)

    While nature generally is a bottomless pit (said in a nice and positive way) of species, it does mean that books are limited to space and also cost, so many lesser observed species may not appear, and that's where we come in.

    As a former hill and moorland walker, grounded by the careless antics of a motorist which required major leg reconstruction, I've always been fascinated by animal, bird and insect behaviour, even as far back as the 70's when as a teenager (yes, I'm an oldie and proud of it) I worked on farms, and could never understand why folk thought wildlife was stupid!

    I was never one to cover the miles, rather let the miles (20 sights in a mile is more awesome than 20 miles in a day and missing everything) cover me in awe of what was out there, wildlife and scenery wise.

    Enjoy your new book, mine is getting dog eared through years (it was heavily used after a good days/weekends walking and camping, and still is used a lot) continual use, but it is in my opinion, been more than value for money.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Mike B:

    couldn't agree more Mike. I had quick look at your Flickr photos and they are just wonderful - you really have a knack for capturing nature.
  • In reply to Garry Hunter:

    Garry Hunter said:
    couldn't agree more Mike. I had quick look at your Flickr photos and they are just wonderful - you really have a knack for capturing nature.

    Thank you Gary, I try and give it my best shot (pun intended), and I do enjoy being outdoors and taking photos.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler