What type of spider is this?

Any one know what type of spider this is?

thanks

  • I think it is a walnut orb spider. Might be wrong though.....
  • Oh that sounds harmless is it? Someone at work told me its a poisonous false widow spider but surely thats not it?
  • In reply to Corkguy:

    As far as I understand it, False Widows (there are more than 1 type in the UK) are called that simply because they look like or are from the same family as the infamous Black Widow. It does not imply they are anywhere near as dangerous even though some are non-native invasive species. Having said that, I think your colleague is wrong anyway and it isn't any of the False Widows.
    It isn't easy to tell from the photo (and my ID ability) but I'm not convinced it's a Walnut Orb Weaver either. My guess is that it is either a Common Orb Weaver (Metallina species) or a Furrow Orb Weaver (Larinioides species). Both are common and relatively harmless (as is the Walnut Orb Weaver).

    __________

    Nige   Flickr

  • I don't think it is a common orb as there aren't two triangles at the top of the abdomen from what I can make out, and I don't think it is a furrow orb as there isn't a V shape at the bottom if the abdomen.

    I'm not big on spiders so walnut orb could be wrong. I can't rule it out from what I have read.
  • I'm no expert either so you might be right.
    The reason I suggested alternatives is because I am not convinced the shape of the abdomen is right for a typical walnut orb and, although it is not beyond the realms of possibility, it would seem to be a very light example for one of those from what I have seen. Given that all are common and highly variable I personally wouldn't rule any of them out just yet!

    __________

    Nige   Flickr

  • This is a silver-sided sector spider, or a missing sector orb weaver
  • Definitely of the Orb Spider family, we have a few similar, and I've ID'd those as garden cross, but I could be wrong.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Deejaydidumz:

    That sounds a better match. Mystery solved almost two years later. Amazing how these old threads can be found.

  • In reply to Robbo:

    Robbo said:

    That sounds a better match. Mystery solved almost two years later. Amazing how these old threads can be found.

    All it takes is one person looking back, either on the forum or at someone's posts and respond.

    Its also easy to overlook a post, if there's been a lot of activity, or if someone has been otherwise busy elsewhere.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Mike B:

    Yes, that's what I meant. Almost seems easier to find two year old posts than ones from 24/36 hours ago, though recently the posts have got so thin on the ground that's n o longer the case.