Have my robins left their nest?

Hi all, 

I’ve had a pair of robins busy building a nest in my ivy over the last week, when I was out refilling the bird feeder Friday evening one of them came flying out and spent quite some time flirting between the fence and a bush near their nest. I saw one of them Saturday morning at the feeder but since then haven’t seen either. 

The feeder is still being used as we’ve just had to refill it but no sign of our friends since Saturday AM & the other half said he’s not seen them going in & out of where they have built the nest. 

Is it possible they’ve decided to move on? We want to check the nest in case there are eggs but don’t want to disturb it if they’re likely to come back. We’re new to this but hoping we’ve not upset our newest residents already! 

  • Hello Charli, welcome. If they were only building this week it is highly unlikely that there are eggs yet. If like tits and other birds, thy can find a home to nest in, take in all the materials and still move on to another site and build there. We have a Robin specialist on here, hopefully he will see this and reply.

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

  • In reply to Catlady:

    Hi,
    Do you have the name of the robin specialist on here? I’m a total novice with birds and having a drama with baby robins in my garden.

    Thanks
  • Whether it is robins, or any other species, the advice is the same. There is no need for a specialist to state human interaction with wild bird nests is not allowed. The weather this Spring has been good for some species, but terrible for birds like blackbirds, robins and thrushes. Based on what was written in the original thread, the nest has failed. Either predation of adult, or nest contents, or due to lack of appropriate food for chicks.

  • It was only a suggestion that one of our regular posters may be able to offer some advice.

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

  • As Gem10 stated in another recent thread, advice is conflicting on the Internet (and often on here). It doesn't need to be a specific individual who needs to give the only correct advice re not interfering with bird nests. I understand your point re wanting MC to respond. But, the law is clear enough for anyone to do that. The poster clearly stated about checking the nest, and wanted closure one way or another. No one is going to know what happened exactly based on what was written.
  • I know the the laws regarding not interfering with a nest etc etc and I know that there is no need for a specialist to have to say that. I was merely trying to offer a bit of advice to a new poster and only suggested that someone else (the question was about robins, that is why I had MC in mind but also know that others have knowledge regarding robins and other birds) may be able to add something that I had not. 

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

  • In reply to Catlady:

    Lynn L said:

    I know the the laws regarding not interfering with a nest etc etc. 

    You didn't mention that in your response to the poster who was not aware. I therefore made the point rather than risk waiting days or longer for MC to make the point. Sorry my wording was blunt last night. I've read too many posts across the internet of people wrecking breeding attempts in their gardens by not taking any notice of laws or common sense. People who took chicks out of nests, or kept them in boxes in the house. That sort of activity shouldn't be encouraged and despite over 20 years of consistent advice, telling the public not to interfere with young birds, the issue is getting worse.

  • n.b. I did note the comment about not wanting to disturb the nest incase they come back, and that they're new to this. But, whether they ended up coming back or not, nests should never be disturbed during the breeding season.
  • Just to clarify we didn’t and haven’t checked the nest, it was simply that if they had moved on we wanted to ensure there were no eggs as if there had been, we would have contacted a local wildlife rescue.

    The nest has been untouched and we actually noticed Cole tits going in & out at the same spot yesterday afternoon so again, the nest will be left alone.
  • In reply to Charli:

    Charli said:
    Just to clarify we didn’t and haven’t checked the nest, it was simply that if they had moved on we wanted to ensure there were no eggs as if there had been, we would have contacted a local wildlife rescue.

    You cannot remove eggs from nests. That is my ongoing point. It is unlawful to do so. The local wildlife rescue centre will tell you that if in future you find a nest with eggs in and want to get involved with it. What do you expect anywhere to do with eggs? No one has resources to incubate common garden species' eggs, or then spend weeks bringing hand reared wild birds up.