Is there anything I can do to save a poisoned field mouse?

Sadly found a field mouse this morning who by the looks of him (barely moving but for occasional jerks) has been poisoned. I also found a small speck of blue on his upper teeth which I think confirms it. I've set him up comfortably in a box with some wool, and have given him some water mixed with A-K vitamin (I read that vitamin K can help antidote the poison) via a pipet, but he isn't eating or drinking on his own and doesn't seem to be improving or getting worse. 

It's just so heartbreaking seeing him suffer but I wanted to check if there was absolutely anything I could possibly do to save him before taking steps to end his suffering. 

Any advice greatly appreciated.

  • Afternoon Gemma,
    On a thread earlier today (regarding a Goldfinch), Community member Germain posted the following link:
    https://helpwildlife.co.uk/

    Perhaps you'll find help and advice there?

    All the best -
    Dave
  • Was the vitamin k antidote on an American website by any chance? I would definitely not be giving vitamin supplements to small animals. There are side effects for humans who overdose, let alone mice.

    're your wood/field mouse, I can't help other than supporting your water via pipet action. It is presumably going to be a case of hoping the poison wasn't consumed in fatal quantities.

  • I think it would be wise to wear gloves at least when handling any poisoned animal. I know it is only a small mouse but some poisons can be absorbed though human skin. We are always warned about handling when picking up poisone d raptors,a lot larger I know but best to be careful

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can

  • Thanks to all for your responses.
    I managed to speak to a local vet who advised the use of vitamin K as an antidote to most domestic rat/mouse poisons (rentokil etc) and based on the blue that I found on his mouth she confirmed that as the likely culprit.
    Unfortunately by the time I got him there he was too far gone to be saved, but at least we were able to end his suffering quickly by putting him to sleep.

    this whole experience has been heartbreaking and I hope people will think twice about using such inhumane methods of animal control.

    Luckily the song birds seem to be out in full force today so that's keeping my spirits up.
  • As you say Gemma you shortened the length of time the animal suffered. As our recording area is surrounded by game shoots we are always very cautious of touching both dead/dying birds and what may be poisoned bait so I've become very twitchy about the subject.

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can

  • In reply to Gemmastylist:

    Sorry to hear your news Gemma.

    You tried.

    Dave
  • In reply to Gemmastylist:

    Thanks re vet comments about Vitamin K. Not heard of that before. Just reading up on it now as I should have known about it. Presumably the mouse was found out in the open? Sorry it didnt survive.

  • The problem with the poor animal being found in the open is that it could have been eaten by a predator up the chain and so we could have had another fatality. Poison can be a good way to solve "pest" problems but the knock on effect of secondary poisoning can be dreadful

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can

  • In reply to Seaman:

    Wendy S said:
    Poison can be a good way to solve "pest" problems

    I can't argue against that, Pete (and hey, why argue anyhow?). But as a Swiss project in Israel proved (or so I believe), Barn Owls are another good way.

    A farmer friend of ours here had another solution. He just made the place Stoat-friendly and waited a bit. Which solved his rodent problems.

    I agree with you 100 per cent about the knock-on effect up the chain. Seeing any animal dying because it has been poisoned is a very, very ugly sight. One I'd give a great deal not to have to see again.

    Stoats and Barn Owls for Christmas (if necessary).

    If you have any wrapping tips...

    Dave  

  • Dave, Barn Owls are really picking up in our bit of the Yorkshire Dales but, despite some more far thinking keepers putting owl boxes up, some quarters still worry they take game bird youngsters. Until a couple of years I was recorder for local club and it was good to see numbers increase gradually over the years.

    Pete

    Birding is for everyone no matter how good or bad we are at it,enjoy it while you can