The Young of 2021 share your photos here

  • Young funny wabbits ......     I see this part of the garden when I'm brewing up and could watch these wild bunnies for hours they are so funny.

          sorry, not great pics as had to take these through double glazing   !!

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    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • They look as if they have white collars in Cheshire Hazy, very cute.

    Lot to learn

  • In reply to gaynorsl:

    gaynorsl said:
    They look as if they have white collars in Cheshire Hazy, very cute.

    the young ones do seem to have a white collar whereas the adults do not;   perhaps these are trendy little youngsters   LOL  

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    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • Lovely pics everyone--thanks,
    Hazel, Your bunnies look very healthy (as well as very cute!)--no Myxo there!

    Kind regards, 

    Ann

  • In reply to TJS:

    Nice photos of the juvenile cuckoo Trevor.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Gardenbirder:

    Gardenbirder said:
    Your bunnies look very healthy (as well as very cute!)--no Myxo there!

    A few years ago I encountered a poor rabbit with Myxomatosis at Marbury CP near Northwich and as we were three miles away from the car I carried it to the nearby rangers/VC office so it could pass away undisturbed by dogs.   It's amazing how this virus is still in the gene pool all these years later and very sad when you see what suffering it causes and the wider impact it had not only on rabbits but animals that preyed upon them as food source.    Hindsight is a wonderful thing and at least more is known about this disease now.   

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    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • Hello all, I haven’t had as many youngsters this year in my garden as I normally would but I did get an okay photo or two

  • In reply to HAZY:

    Myxo is a very nasty disease indeed. Luckily, when we had our bun he never had Myxo, VHD or fly strike (some of the main killers of pet rabbits) but we had him vaccinated against everything our vet suggested. Our bun's problem was having been taken from his Mum too soon such that his teeth did not develop properly. Rabbit teeth grow continuously and he needed to have his teeth filed down regularly because they never met properly so did not grind down evenly when he was eating and they intermittently caused sores in his cheek or tongue which made him stop eating. Bunnies need to eat regularly and if they do not, strange things can happen with their unusual digestive system which can kill them. Until we could get him to the vet we had to syringe food into him to keep his tum working properly (and we learned also how to give him injections to cure another strange issue which had him intermittently spinning over and over--I've forgotten just what it is called, but many animals, including people, can get that condition to one degree or another and it has several unrelated possible causes). But bunnies do not cope well with being knocked out at the vet's and sometimes they can die because of that. Our bun had to be put under to have his teeth filed down, and sadly that did for him in the end after several successful filing-down sessions over previous times. But while he lived, he had a very good life, especially considering he appeared unexpectedly in our back garden one day and we took him in (not wanting to find one morning that he'd been injured or killed in the garden by a fox!), and because we bought pet insurance or we would have had to spend a small fortune on his many vet visits, and because he spent his life, once he found us, being carefully and lovingly cared for by us! We even took him with us on holiday, not wanting our friends needing to worry about his teeth problems cropping up while we were away. His hutch, bedding, food, etc. took up the entire back seat of the car, a bit like travelling with children (but less noisy!) Watching him explore and gradually get accustomed to an unfamiliar holiday cottage was hilarious, and taking him back to one he'd seen a year previously was fascinating--he clearly remembered it and he scampered around the place looking very happy! Of course each time we did that, we had to bunny-proof the place before we let him out of his travel box, putting up barriers so he could not chew any flexes, or get behind or under any furniture which we'd no idea what might be under or behind them which he might damage (or might damage him!), etc.

    Kind regards, 

    Ann

  • Your bunny rabbit was lucky he found your garden with such kindness and TLC to care for him and for all that hard work you certainly got rewards back with his cuteness and fun loving memories. We had rabbits as children living in the countryside; I must find a photo of the pet rabbit we had when I was outside in the garden wheeling it around in my dolls pram LOL !!

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    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • In reply to Gardenbirder:

    That's a lovely story about your rescued wee wabbit Ann. He will have had the life of Riley, living in your home and of course in his holiday homes as well!

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.