Haywood 16th April

As I said, I would make another visit to Hay Wood, and try a different section. it would be nice to spend a day there, rather than just a couple of hours, but that should come soon.

There was an interesting warped scots pine...

A closer view

And in another tree, not far away, a rather large nest, quite high up. My estimation around 20mtrs up

A zoomed in view

While walking along the widened path, a raptor flew past. Sadly, too many trees around kept taking the A/F, so this was the best shot I got. Looking at the wing tips, my wild guess, peregrine falcon, but I'm open to corrections and suggestions.

Once the raptor had flown past, noise came back to the woodland, and a coal tit made a brief appearance.

Again, the wildlife was high up and very vocal, but not very visible, though I did spot a tree creeper, sneaking around a tree trunk as they do... It was a bit frustrating that whenever the camera managed to focus on the TC, there was a small branch photobombing!

Any guesses on the blossom?

Its not cherry, the next pic shows the tree, the one that is leaning (lazy thing) and being supported by its neighbour

To end the walk, these next three I think are hazel, they have the typical long straight trunks, (though still very juvenile) and branches.

Just across the road from where I'd parked, I noticed the bluebells were starting to show their flowers...

And a final look back up the widened path before heading home

Stay safe folks

Mike

Flickr Peak Rambler

  • The raptor is a buzzard.

    The tree looks a cherry type. Why don't you reckon it is? Leaves look cherry. Mine is in full flower now.
  • Looks like a good walk and as you say worth a longer visit. Little Treecreepers are even worse than Nuthatches for hiding behind errant twigs.

    __________

    Nige   Flickr

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    I'm not sure the twigs are errant, Nige, I think these birds have a secret pouch they carry them round in lol
  • It wouldn't surprise me. They are probably telescopic twigs for easy transportation. Female Nutties and TC's probably knit them while sitting on the nest.

    __________

    Nige   Flickr

  • Nice to see your photos Mike, I thought the blossom was May but then saw the size of the tree, It is a wonder anything is flowering with the night frosts we have each night - up here anyway.

    Lot to learn

  • In reply to Robbo:

    Robbo said:
    The raptor is a buzzard.



    The tree looks a cherry type. Why don't you reckon it is? Leaves look cherry. Mine is in full flower now.

    Many thanks for the buzzard correction, it did seem strange to be PF, but no finger feathers on the wing tips made my plump for PF.

    I have to confess, the blossom did look like cherry, and was exactly the same as the blossom on our cherry tree, also in full blossom. But the tree wasn't of the shape that cherry trees normally take, even if it was listing. That could be due to the high tree canopy, as with any plants, shrub and tree, they all fight for their share of sunlight. So the corrections etc are very much appreciated.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    Nigel O said:
    Looks like a good walk and as you say worth a longer visit. Little Treecreepers are even worse than Nuthatches for hiding behind errant twigs.

    Thanks Nige.

    I have to agree regarding nuthatches vs tree creepers, though TBH, the nuthatches I generally see have learned hiding is not an option, there's too much food to miss out on when folk pass by and leave bird seed at the feeding stations....

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to PimperneBloke:

    PimperneBloke said:
    I'm not sure the twigs are errant, Nige, I think these birds have a secret pouch they carry them round in lol

    Their conspiracies have finally been unearthed! 

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to gaynorsl:

    gaynorsl said:
    Nice to see your photos Mike, I thought the blossom was May but then saw the size of the tree, It is a wonder anything is flowering with the night frosts we have each night - up here anyway.

    I'm confused, not hard for me when plants are concerned! 

    I've had a close look at that photo, plus one of our cherry blossom, they are very similar (look the same in my eyes), except, the spread is greater on the woodland blossom than our cherry tree.

    The leaf on the photos looks cherry, it was just the fact it was tall and slim whereas cherry trees I've seen seem to spread out more, but that could be due to the high tree canopy.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • There are a number of cherry varieties. Bird cherry and wild cherry are two I'd recommend for wildlife. Obviously, there are all sorts of ornamentals as well as fruiting varieties too. They'll all have variable growth habits (and different rootstocks in some of the latter cases). Assuming the tree here is cherry (and I don't guarantee it, but I reckon it is), the vertical shape does suggest it's had to grow with deprived light, amongst a lot of taller vegetation.