Pomarine Skua at Donna Nook 24 &25 November 2019

The highlight of this year's trip to Donna Nook seal colony was undoubtedly a Pomarine Skua which was enjoying all the free protein. Unfortunately the bird has a damaged left leg which makes take off a little difficult and it spends a lot of time sitting a well. It can fly perfectly well and is able to stand well enough when feeding, so perhaps all is not lots. Certainly a big tick for me anyway.

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Cheers,

Bob

My Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobs_retired_now/

  • Amazing, Bob. One of the birds on my I'll-never-see-one list.

    So nice to see one here.

    Best regards -
    Dave
  • Superb, Bob. Ditto Dave about the list!
  • What a treat, probably a once in a lifetime sighting. Excellent photos.

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    Regards,Tony

    My Flickr Photostream 

  • What a beautiful bird and a thrill to see but hope it can continue to survive long term with that poorly leg;   I remember seeing a Great Skua a 6 years ago at Little Eye (part of the Hilbre group of islands, Wirral)  and that also had a leg injury but from what folk said it was managing to live of crustaceans as each new tide brought new food in.  Never knew what happened to this amazing seabird but think it was going to struggle to survive.    It was good to see that all photographers that I witnessed kept a discrete distance so as not to distress the bird unnecessarily and used their zoom lenses - as you did Bob.        

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    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • In reply to Dave - CH:

    Dave - CH said:
    Amazing, Bob. One of the birds on my I'll-never-see-one list.

    So nice to see one here.

    Best regards -
    Dave

    This bird has been there a while and I suspect that it will be there while all the free protein is going. There are still about 300 cows to have pups so it could be worth a visit :)

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    Cheers,

    Bob

    My Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobs_retired_now/

  • In reply to PimperneBloke:

    PimperneBloke said:
    Superb, Bob. Ditto Dave about the list!

    This bird has been there a while and I suspect that it will be there while all the free protein is going. There are still about 300 cows to have pups so it could be worth a visit :)

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    Cheers,

    Bob

    My Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobs_retired_now/

  • In reply to TeeJay:

    TeeJay said:
    What a treat, probably a once in a lifetime sighting. Excellent photos.

    This bird has been there a while and I suspect that it will be there while all the free protein is going. There are still about 300 cows to have pups so it could be worth a visit :)

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    Cheers,

    Bob

    My Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobs_retired_now/

  • In reply to Bobs_Still_Retired:

    Bobs_Still_Retired said:
    t could be worth a visit

    I'll check the bus times Bob...

  • Cracking photos Bob has it always had that bad leg while it has been there, I've seen quite a few photos on Twitter and you are the only one to mention the bad leg as far as I can see.

    My Flickr photos

  • In reply to Alan.:

    Alan. said:
    Cracking photos Bob has it always had that bad leg while it has been there, I've seen quite a few photos on Twitter and you are the only one to mention the bad leg as far as I can see.

    I don't know to be honest Alan. The only pictures I have seen have been fairly small, which I thought might be big crops though looking back it may just have been people using small lenses for the seals. The bird is actually quite close in, I guess it realises what the fence is there for - i only used the 400mm lens for those shots. When I was talking to one of the wardens, he said he had been the first to see it and had taken lots of photos but when i mentioned it having a bad leg he didn't realise it had until I showed him my pics. H eshowed me some of his but you couldn't really see the legs. I don't know much about Skuas but it did spend most of its time sitting down in the grass, which is not something you really see with the big gulls, they seem happy to stand for hours on end. It didn't do too much flying about either - I only witnessed that one take off and it definitely stumbled as it tried to take a running start like most big gulls - you can see it sort of dipped down as it was lifting off. I wonder if people were just in awe of seeing one so close and never really got the chance to notice. Might be worth reviewing some of the twitter pics - the angle of the left leg is very noticeably different.

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    Cheers,

    Bob

    My Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobs_retired_now/