Visit To N Norfolk - Wells Next The Sea

After our day at Titchwell we went to Wells the next morning before the heavens open to walk down the estuary path to the lifeboat station at the beach end. Depending on tide there are often an interesting mix of birds about. We were lucky with the tide out.

The view from the quay towards the lifeboat station with some Brent Geese

Starlings on the watch.

Brent Geese having a family banter..

Looking for the ark before the floods 

Ringed Plover

Off to go whiffling

Grey Plover

I know there's something in this hole..

Right thats the starter what's next..

Grey Plover 

Oystercatcher

Ringed Plover

Just look how this wind blows the sauce off my spaghetti seaweed

Oh that waters cold....

Wish my beak was longer, I need a good scratch

The large and the small..

The Brent Geese suddenly all took off and I tried for some inflight shots and got this..

I'm really not are what it is so any suggestions would be appreciated. I think its a bird of prey but.............

And finally 3 different lifeboats of varying ages and class (I think)

KR
Tony

https://www.flickr.com/photos/wherryman/

  • Some very nice photos and sightings. Brent Geese are birds that I rarely see here in the NW. Nice to get the Curlew catching a starter.
    Your in-flight bird and possible raptor is actually a juvenile Lesser Black-back Gull. At least until someone suggests something different :)

    __________

    Nige   Flickr

  • beautiful scenic shots and collection of waterfowl

    _________________________________________________________________________

    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • Nice selection of pictures Tony.

    Jim

    My Pictures

  • I think you've captured the unique nature of the east coast with your photos, Tony. I've got a soft spot for plovers - they always seem vulnerable but are surprisingly feisty. Good to see the Grey Plover in particular. Just a shame we usually only see them in winter plumage. In summer plumage they are stunning.
    I hope those Lifeboats are have been retired. They won't be going anywhere in a hurry.

    ____________________________________________________________________

    Regards,Tony

    My Flickr Photostream 

  • Lovely to see the waders Tony and especially like the first and last photos with the lighting just right.

    Lot to learn

  • Lovely variety there Tony, more ammunition for Mrs PB to insist on a visit :o)
  • Tony T said:

    After our day at Titchwell we went to Wells the next morning before the heavens open to walk down the estuary path to the lifeboat station at the beach end. Depending on tide there are often an interesting mix of birds about. We were lucky with the tide out.

    The view from the quay towards the lifeboat station with some Brent Geese

    I know there's something in this hole..

    Right thats the starter what's next..

    And finally 3 different lifeboats of varying ages and class (I think)

    Fabulous photos Tony, and I really like the curlew with probably a lugworm for lunch.

    The lifeboats are all retired.

    37-04, an Oakley Class, Lifeboat, was from Filey, from 1968 - 1991:

    https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Oakley_Class_37-04_Robert_and_Dorothy_Hardcastle_at_Hartlepool.jpg

    http://www.g7lfc.me.uk/rnli/filey-lifeboat-37-04-oakley-robert-dorothy-hardcastle-discovered-alive-and-well-in-hartlepool/

    33-01 doesn't seem to have much info, but it seems it was a trial boat and service was shortlived, 1981 - 1982.

    https://www.lifeboatsonline.com/RNLIBrede.html

    More useless info, with All Weather Lifeboats, (ALB) the first two numbers represent the hull length in metres or feet. Typically over 25 are hull lengths in feet, under 25 are hull lengths in metres. The second two numbers are unique to the boat.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • Fascinating info Mike thanks for the links, a font of information Any thoughts on why the 3 would be moored up on the sands unless its storage space.
    I was pleased with the Curlew picture, taken on the new EOS90D with my very old 100-400mm lens which I've sold along with old EOS20D & Sigma lens. I think I'll buy a second hand 100-400mm MKII, or at least I hope my wife would take it on board as an idea for xmas!

    KR
    Tony

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/wherryman/

  • In reply to tony:

    Tony T said:
    Fascinating info Mike thanks for the links, a font of information Any thoughts on why the 3 would be moored up on the sands unless its storage space.
    I was pleased with the Curlew picture, taken on the new EOS90D with my very old 100-400mm lens which I've sold along with old EOS20D & Sigma lens. I think I'll buy a second hand 100-400mm MKII, or at least I hope my wife would take it on board as an idea for xmas!

    You're welcome.

    Virtually all old and retired lifeboats are sold on, many are renovated for more sedate usage, some make it as pilot vessels for small harbours, while others are kept as museum pieces, some working, others at rest.

    My guess is someone local has bought them, either individually or collectively, I can only guess because they are still in RNLI livery, they are working museum pieces.

    If you put in to Google or any other search engine Lifeboat and then it's number ie lifeboat 33-01, and trawl through, you'll most likely come up with some interesting information, not just post retirement, but its service as well.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler