Interloper Goose with grey lags?

On my last visit to RSPB Conwy (see: RSPB Conwy 21 Sept 2019) I had observed an "interloper goose", using Dave CH's words, who commented on it, that had flown in with a flock of grey lag geese.

I would guess others will have noticed it as well.

After some searching, and various suggestions, I'm tempted to think it is a Canada goose with non-standard markings, or possibly hybrid?

I'm open to any suggestions...

Mike

Flickr Peak Rambler

  • Certainly an unusual spot and nice to photos of it. Goose hybrids do happen and I believe there have been many instances of hybrids between Canada and Greylag geese. Photos of those hybrids on the web are a reasonable match for this one, too.

    __________

    Nige   Flickr

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    Nigel O said:
    Certainly an unusual spot and nice to photos of it. Goose hybrids do happen and I believe there have been many instances of hybrids between Canada and Greylag geese. Photos of those hybrids on the web are a reasonable match for this one, too.

    Thank you Nige, and yes, I've come across a few hybrid geese over the years.

    I've spent a decent amount of time trawling the web, but nothing really struck me as relevant, hence the delay in posting.

    But I'm sure somewhere it will have been spotted and commented on.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • Honoured that you picked up on that comment, Mike. And looking forward to more opinions on hybrids.

    We used to spend a lot of time around geese, living within easy striking distance of the country's largest wetlands reserve, but that tailed off when we swapped watching birds for seeing birds (due mainly to time constraints).

    We're now mainly spotting them from speeding vehicles. Having just driven through France twice, we have a whole collection of 'seen from speeding van', including Lapwings and a Goshawk.

    Could be a new birdwatching branch?

    All the best -
    Dave
  • LOL, Dave--we always count the birds of prey when whizzing up or down the M40. Now there are usually lots of Red Kites (a successful re-introduction project in the UK) as well as a few Buzzards each time, but sadly, now we almost never see any Kestrels on that journey, probably due to the addition of trees and bushes to the verges 20 or more years ago rather than the tussocky grasses of yesteryear which housed prey for Kestrels. Improved scenery for people but ruined habitat for Kestrels. We used to do the trip 3, 4 or more times per year but now it is only one or two in a year.

    Kind regards, 

    Ann

  • Ah, Ann, glad we're not alone there then.

    Personally, we find a broad swathe of France particularly challenging as, north and west of the Franche Montagnes, Common Buzzards are amazingly variable, with lots of very, very pale morphs.

    Plenty of Kestrels on our route through France and the UK in the last few days; perhaps we were lucky.

    Our best sighting on this particular trip was the adult Goshawk, and we once, in Germany, we had a hunting Peregrine. That we were particularly proud of as it was spotted at around 95 miles an hour (us, not the bird).

    Dave
  • Dave, Lucky you, seeing the Goshawk and the hunting Peregrine. I've yet to see a Goshawk clearly anywhere. There was one flyover by a Goshawk (according to more experienced birders) one day when we were visiting Symonds Yat Rock, a cliff top above the Wye Valley on the English/Welsh border, but to me it was a blurry black shape of unknown bird of prey.

    Kind regards, 

    Ann

  • In reply to Gardenbirder:

    T'was the same for us for a long time Ann. An unfamiliar silhouette at tree-top level; a glide through the forest.

    We then got lucky with a young one that we actually spotted from the garden of our old place. Watched it for most of one morning with the scope.

    Since we moved, however, things have changed. There's actually pair nesting in the forest behind the house and we've had a few test flights (all over now, of course). First spotted by a (experienced in these matters) neighbour. Then you start to keep an ear out for them.

    A bit surprised that they're cohabiting with Tawnies, which we heard absolutely every night since we moved in early June, including the young ones (before they made off in search of new territories). But there you go.

    The moral of the tale? Switzerland is a great place to see birds (preparing the ground for when we open the guest house, you know...)

    :-)

    Dave
  • In reply to Dave - CH:

    Dave - CH said:
    when we open the guest house

    En suite double for me and Mrs PB s'il vous plait monsieur 

  • Dave, With enough notice of when you're opening the guest house, we'll be booking as well--LOL! It would have to be on our way to or from our attempt to look for remnants of a haberdasher's shop about 10 miles south of Basel! Not sure that will ever come to pass...

    Kind regards, 

    Ann

  • Sorry PB. It's a turn of the century vicage, so we're a bit limited when it comes to en suite. There's a loo right next to the guest room though...