The wonders of Wildlife! (2019) Share your tales and photos here

I think I started a similar topic last year, but hey-ho, here goes for this year, but I can't find it.

Last year it was the wood pigeon learning to use a bird feeder to feed from, and to spill seed to be eaten from the ground below.

We now have a male blackbird doing exactly the same.

I apologise for the poor quality of photos, the light was poor and they were taken through the kitchen window.

Hmmm, shall I or shan't I?

Here goes

Abort, I missed

OK, I know I can do it, I've done it before, so lets try again....

Cleared to land

The final approach and all is looking good.

Phew!

Done it.....

Now for my just reward.....

Not forgetting the drip tray....

Aren't I a clever boy?

Is the coast still clear?

Yes it is, time for one more suet pellet and then off...

Mike

Flickr Peak Rambler

  • Great thread and photo sequence Mike

    _________________________________________________________________________

    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • Blackbirds are very persistent, especially when it comes to learning how to get food. I know the ones in my garden trained me to feed them :).

    __________

    Nige   Flickr

  • My own particular favourite, Mike, happened here many years ago. Fortunately (as you will see), I don't have any photos.

    We were regularly feeding hedgehogs and as we didn't see why we should be using terracotta dishes we used plastic. Also, it was before we had built feeding stations, so the dish was just out in the open, very close to the house.

    One morning, one of the dishes was simply gone. And I couldn't find it anywhere.

    That year, as we have done many times over the past 12 years, we had left large islands of the 'lawn' long to enjoy the various waves of wildflowers and grasses that have colonised the garden over the decades. And in the middle of one of those islands was where, days later, I did eventually find the dish.

    A fox had taken the dish into the long grass to eat the contents in peace. And we knew it was a fox because, once the dish was empty, he or she had used it as a toilet. But right slap in the middle of the dish with admirable precision. We think it meant, 'Give it a wash before you fill it up, will you?'

    All the best -

    Dave

  • In reply to HAZY:

    HAZY said:
    Great thread and photo sequence Mike

    Thank you Hazel.

    I know you're a keen photographer, so please, if you have any, do share them

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    Nigel O said:
    Blackbirds are very persistent, especially when it comes to learning how to get food. I know the ones in my garden trained me to feed them :).

    Nature generally is persistent, that's how species survive.

    I find it fascinating watching how the various species, grey squirrels included, set out to get their food, and how they succumb to that step too far and make do with what they can get away with.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Dave - CH:

    Dave - CH said:

    My own particular favourite, Mike, happened here many years ago. Fortunately (as you will see), I don't have any photos.

    We were regularly feeding hedgehogs and as we didn't see why we should be using terracotta dishes we used plastic. Also, it was before we had built feeding stations, so the dish was just out in the open, very close to the house.

    One morning, one of the dishes was simply gone. And I couldn't find it anywhere.

    That year, as we have done many times over the past 12 years, we had left large islands of the 'lawn' long to enjoy the various waves of wildflowers and grasses that have colonised the garden over the decades. And in the middle of one of those islands was where, days later, I did eventually find the dish.

    A fox had taken the dish into the long grass to eat the contents in peace. And we knew it was a fox because, once the dish was empty, he or she had used it as a toilet. But right slap in the middle of the dish with admirable precision. We think it meant, 'Give it a wash before you fill it up, will you?'

    All the best -

    Dave

    If you see my reply to Nige, nature can be very persistent, and will aim to get the food however it can, and if they can't execute what others do, they manage to succumb to second best.

    What we did find interesting, we had to move the feeder because the wood pigeons were trampling nearby flowers grown to feed bees, wasps and butterflies. The feeder in question had a small wall nearby where the WP's managed to leap from to land on the feeder and scoff away.

    Now the feeder is away from the wall, they can't launch on to it, but they still try, and have been watching the blackbirds glide down from the nearby fence and calmly land on the feeder. Needless to say, the WP's have tried the same, unsuccessfully, but keep trying.

    I will get some video, once I manage to find a suitable spot to place the Bushnell Gardencam.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler