All about Insects 2018

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    Here's a photo I took just over a year ago of the Greater water boatmen on our pond  - backswimmer with long oars !     You have to be careful with this larger variety as they will nip you if you put any limbs in the water !   

    and another one -  not swimming on back !        think they were laying eggs as there was larvae around

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    Regards, Hazel 

    My Flickr. photo  link HERE 

  • In reply to HAZY:

    No paddling then aitch! Lol

     

     2013 photos & vids here

    eff37 on Flickr

  • In reply to WendyBartter:

    WendyBartter said:

    No paddling then aitch! Lol

       No lol,   we learned early on not to go wading to clean out the algae  !   

    _________________________________________________________________________

    Regards, Hazel 

    My Flickr. photo  link HERE 

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    Nigel O said:

    Is it a another name for a water boatman Nige?

    I think water boatman is often used for a group of species that look very similar, and until recently was the only one I knew but apparently it depends on Lesser- or Greater-. Now, the biologists are now trying to differentiate the terms to avoid confusion. As far as I understand, in the UK, water boatmen (also lesser water boatmen or Corixa sp.) don't swim on their backs and they are herbivorous, whereas backswimmers (also greater water boatmen or Notonecta sp.) swim upside down and are insectivorous. The photo is one of the Notonecta sp. and so it is more accurately a backswimmer by that definition. All the fun of trying to ID the little critters when you photograph them, eh :)

    [/quote]

    They are actually a species in their own right, complete with their own Latin name; Corixa Punctate.

    However, the term waterboatman is over used to encompass pondskates as well, among many other water surface insects.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Mike B:

    Took these in 2007.

    Jim

    My Pictures

  • In reply to WendyBartter:

    It surprises me how many you can get in a pond. I've seen dozens in a tiny pool. You wouldn't believe there was enough for them all to eat, well, unless you go paddling!!!

    Excellent close-ups, Jim

    WendyBartter said:
    Yours could be N.maculata with those large red eyes ... mine looks like N.glauca?

    I looked on NatureSpot first, too, where they say N. Glauca also has red eyes, so since I can't see the pronotum well enough, I'll accept unidentified N. species :)

    The one on your hand looks odd, very pale and not really any wing-case markings. Was it newly emerged do you think?

    Mike

    I understood Corixa Punctata was just one of several similar species commonly known as Lesser Water Boatmen, although perhaps it is the common one. You'd probably need to be an expert to determine the exact species though, which is were the common name often wins for me, because you don't need to go into that detail.

    __________

    Nige   Flickr

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    Nigel O said:
    The one on your hand looks odd, very pale and not really any wing-case markings. Was it newly emerged do you think?

    I did wonder that too Nige but did find an image on Google very sililarly pale & labelled N.glauca!

    ITM, this quite large & handsome beastie quite literally bounced off my head & landed at my feet as I walked garden path today ... one of my favourites, Western Conifer seed bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis) ... what a grand name!

     

     2013 photos & vids here

    eff37 on Flickr

  • In reply to WendyBartter:

    WendyBartter said:
    this quite large & handsome beastie quite literally bounced off my head & landed at my feet as I walked garden path today

    Ha! They aren't the most graceful are they? Given they often land upside down and it then takes them 5 minutes to turn the right way up I can't help thinking Shieldbugs and the like only survive because of the 'orrible smelly goo they exude when attacked :) 

    __________

    Nige   Flickr

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    Thanks Nige.

    Thats one nice looking bug Wendy.

    Jim

    My Pictures

  • In reply to James:

    We had Conehead Mantis turn up in the house today, I think it came in with the firewood, it started on my neck & I flicked it off (not knowing what it was) but luckily didn't hurt it, so after a crawl up my sleeve I put it on the door handle for a photo, it then went on the log-bag & finished on the curtain. Quite an adventure.  After the photo session I popped it in the barn on the wood not destined for burning this year!

    They certainly are a very odd looking insect.

    Best wishes

    Hazel in the Gironde estuary, France