All about Insects 2018

  • In reply to James:

    James G said:
    and a White Letter Hairstreak.

    Nice one - not seen one of those.

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    Nige   Flickr

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    I spotted this large hoverfly at Pennington today.

    You can't really tell from the photo but it was big. If I am not mistaken, it looks very much like a Volucella Zonaria - a hornet mimic. I didn't think they came this far north, so I looked up the records and although it has been close I couldn't find a more northerly sighting so far. If I have ID'd it correctly (and I think I have), I would be impressed! 

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    Nige   Flickr

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    This little fella was crawling on my compost heap, trying to get to cover between the gaps. It kept falling off the wood onto its back. I eventually popped the fella round the side of the compost heap in amongst leaf litter. It might find some slugs there (though the hot, dry spell has reduced their numbers considerably) and eat them.

    I've never seen one like this before.

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    That was my firt time too seeing a White Letter Hairstreak Nige.

    Jim

    My Pictures

  • In reply to James:

    Dor beetle Angus!

     

     2013 photos & vids here

    eff37 on Flickr

     

  • In reply to WendyBartter:

    WendyBartter said:

    Dor beetle Angus!

    Thank you, Wendy.  It is a gorgeous beetle. I hope it found a safe hidey hole by the compost heap. We need our beetles.

  • In reply to Angus M:

    A rather striking fly

    It's neither wasp nor hoverfly but doesn't seem to have a common name, just Conops Quadrifasciatus.

      

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    Nige   Flickr

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    I found this on the top of the north embankment of Manor farm. It was on flat ground. The wasp nest looks as if it had been damaged, possibly one of the foxes digging at it, but I can't be sure. I don't remember seeing it until Friday evening.

    A word about the north embankment. To get at gravels beds, Cemex scraped the soil off the top of the land and piled it up into a series of embankments around the quarry. These embankments range in height from roughly 10' (3m) to about 30' (10m) in places. They are a mixture of different soil types, but the tops seem mostly sandy.  Hardly surprising, I reckon, due to it being more sandy the closer you get to the gravel beds.

    I think that once the various ponds have been filled in with a base of spoil, rubble, general building rubbish, etc then the whole lot will be capped by bulldozing the embankments over the land.

  • In reply to Angus M:

    Do you get Honey Buzzards around there? They love a nice wasps nest.

    Best wishes

    Hazel in the Gironde estuary, France

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    Nigel O said:

    A rather striking fly

    It's neither wasp nor hoverfly but doesn't seem to have a common name, just Conops Quadrifasciatus.

      

    Interesting that you found no alternative name, however, Wikipedia, if you believe what they have published, also call it the Yellow Banded Conops, which if you search on that name, only Wikipedia gives that name a mention!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conops_quadrifasciatus

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler