All about Insects 2017

  • In reply to tony:

    Tony T said:
    these are pics of butterflies taken over the past few months at various places around Suffolk

    Tony T said:

    This one in the garden I"m not sure what it is, anyone ID please.

    Great set of photos Tony, the Tortoishell is beautiful. The little one in the garden is a Small Copper, also one of my favourites.

    Best wishes

    Hazel in the Gironde estuary, France

  • In reply to WendyBartter:

    Love the item about Dragonflies Wendy, great for all ages!

    Best wishes

    Hazel in the Gironde estuary, France

  • In reply to James:

    James G said:

    Got this Dragon the other day, its only a small one and have no idea what it is.

     




    This is a Common Darter (both of the photos in the original post show a Common Darter).
    Although the legs look all dark in the photos, which is typically a feature that points to Ruddy Darter, this is not unusual for aging Common Darters. The shape and colour of the abdomen, yellow & black thorax sides, and brown face point to the correct identification.

  • In reply to RoyW:

    Thank you Roy.

    Jim

    Jim

    My Pictures

  • In reply to tony:

    Tony T said:

    These were taken at Minsmere back in June, a colourful looking snail but no idea what kind.

    This is a Banded Snail - probably a Dark-lipped Banded Snail, Cepaea nemoralis, but Pale-lipped Banded Snails, Cepaea hortensis, can confusingly sometimes have a dark lip to the shell.

    .

    The 'Meadow Brown' butterfly in the same post is actually a worn Ringlet.

  • In reply to Cyclist:

    Cyclist said:
    I'm guessing it is laying eggs, however everything I read suggests they lay eggs in the water.  So is this one hoping its eggs will get washed out of the moss into the water - or may be it has nothing to do with egg laying and could it be scenting ?

    Some species of dragonfly. like this Southern Hawker, will sometimes lay their eggs into vegetation that is above, or beside, a pond but not actually in the water. If the water level in the pond does not cover the plants that the eggs were laid in at the time of hatching, when the eggs hatch the larvae (or pro-larvae as they are initially known) are inside a membranous sac but are able to 'jump' around by flicking their bodies. The membrane breaks on contact with the water.

    A few species, Emerald Damselflies being the most widespread one in the UK, regularly breed in ponds that dry up during the summer, laying eggs into plants in the hollows that will fill with water over the winter months. The eggs don't hatch until the following spring, and the larvae then grow quickly and emerge as adult damselflies before the pond dries up in late summer.

  • In reply to RoyW:

    Thanks Roy for all the interesting info, I thought the Meadow brown looked odd, should have realised what it was!!

    Best wishes

    Hazel in the Gironde estuary, France

  • In reply to Noisette:

    A Red Admiral from a few weeks ago.

    And something to make you feel a wee bit better if you ever think you're having a bad hair day.!! :-)

    My bird photos HERE

  • In reply to Paul A:

    Paul A said:
    And something to make you feel a wee bit better if you ever think you're having a bad hair day.!! :-)

    I wish I had that much hair Paul ! LOL

    A few from around the garden, a Geranium bronze

    a Shield bug Centrocoris variegatus

    & a side view to show it's spines

    & lovely Scarce Swallowtail

    Best wishes

    Hazel in the Gironde estuary, France

  • In reply to RoyW:

    Thanks Roy, how can you tell the difference between the "meadow brown & a "worn ringlet?'

    Cheers

    Tony


    Tony

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/wherryman/