• BBC Springwatch features Mull white-tailed eagles

    Iona and Fingal are having to pull out all the stops to bring in food for their offspring, so on most days we are seeing lots of activity around the nest.  We are still seeing other eagles soaring and flying over, including the non-breeding pair of golden eagles that appear to be looking to set up a territory nearby.  The chick(s) will be growing rapidly in the coming week and we should shortly be able to get clear views…

    • 26 May 2014
  • MULL EAGLE WATCH

    The sightings at Mull Eagle Watch just keep on getting better, especially now the adult white-tailed eagles are feeding their offspring. Fingal the male, particularly, is bringing in increasing numbers of small prey items including fish, gulls and greylag geese, while before the first egg hatched on 7th May, both adults were taking it in turns to incubate the eggs or feed on the carcase of a red deer up on the moorland…

    • 18 May 2014
  • IONA & FINGAL ARE PARENTS AGAIN

    Iona and Fingal, our pair of white-tailed eagles, are parents again.  On Wednesday morning this week I arrived at the Mull Eagle Watch hide early, hoping that there would be signs that the first egg had hatched, exactly 38 days after we saw the female hunker down on the nest to start laying.  As soon as I trained the telescope on the nest it was clear that both adults were there, their pale heads and huge yellow beaks visible…

    • 11 May 2014
  • Mull Eagle Watch Blog - Weeks 5 & 6 2014

    Iona and Fingal, our pair of white-tailed eagles at Mull Eagle Watch, are being brilliant parents as we reach the end of the 38 incubation period (1st egg due to hatch 6th or 7th May). Iona is doing the larger share of nest-sitting: spending long hours sat keeping the eggs warm, occasionally standing up, tucking her talons into her feet to avoid damaging the eggs, and fussing over them to make sure they are incubating…

    • 7 May 2014
  • Mull Eagle Watch - Week 4 2014

    Our pair of white-tailed eagles, Iona and Fingal, have chosen a very sensible new nest site this year in the saucer-shaped broken top of a spruce tree. The weather has been warm and sunny most of the week, but several days have been quite windy too and last year’s nest, 25 metres up in an exposed location has been buffeted around. Even the regular roosting sites (where the adult bird that is not incubating the eggs sits…

    • 1 May 2014