• Skies alive with geese

    For many of us spotting our first geese of the autumn is a sure sign that colder days are on the way. Find out more about these annual visitors to Scotland and some of the places where you can see them in this blog by RSPB Scotland's Jess Barrett.

    Skies alive with geese


    “Honk honk!” has to be one of my favourite bird calls to hear at this time of year when out on a coastal walk, wrapped up against the crisp cool…

    • 28 Oct 2017
  • A year of nature at Coul Links

    Coul Links is a rare duneland habitat on the Sutherland coast which is being threatened with destruction by plans to build a golf course. Here RSPB Scotland’s conservation officer Alison Searl recalls a year of nature at Coul Links and why we’re part of a coaltion of conservation organisations campaigning to save it. Details on how you can help by submitting objections are included at the end. 

    A year of nature…

    • 26 Oct 2017
  • Small scabious mining bee: an angel to a devil

    This is the fifth post in a six part blog series about rare insects in the Cairngorms. A new project launched this year to save six endangered invertebrates in the north of Scotland and project officer Gabrielle Flinn will take a closer look at one of these species each month. This time, it's the turn of the small scabious mining bee. The Rare Invertebrates in the Cairngorms project is a partnership involving RSPB Scotland…

    • 19 Oct 2017
  • The Essence of Place: An outdoor audiovisual installation

    Our Loch Lomond reserve is an amazing place for wildlife and a great place to visit to feel inspired by the natural world. Since the beginning of the year Susannah Ramsay has been an artist in residence at the reserve. Find out why she was drawn to Loch Lomond and the work that has come from her time spent there, including a special event taking place later this month. 

    The Essence of Place: An outdoor audiovisual inst…

    • 14 Oct 2017
  • Five facts you need to know about waxwings

    Waxwings are sprightly, stocky birds, smaller in size than a starling and easily recognisable by their prominent crest. They also have a black ‘eye mask’, a colourful pattern on their wings, and the tips of their flight feathers end in ‘spikes’ that look like pieces of bright red wax. They’re a favourite with wildlife fans and during our most recent Big Garden Birdwatch they were recorded in nine times more gardens…

    • 12 Oct 2017
  • Forth & Tay Judicial Review: what we believe is at stake?

    RSPB Scotland's head of planning and development Aedán Smith sets out what we believe is at stake with regard to the Judicial Review into the Forth and Tay offshore windfarms.

    Forth & Tay Judicial Review: what we believe is at stake?


    As previously reported RSPB Scotland has applied to the Supreme Court for permission to appeal the Inner House, Court of Session Opinion on our Judicial Review of the decisions…

    • 4 Oct 2017
  • The Scottish Government ruling out fracking is a win for climate and wildlife – and for the precautionary principle

    Today the Scottish Energy Minister Paul Wheelhouse announced to MSPs the Scottish Government's decision to ban fracking. Here RSPB Scotland's climate and energy senior policy officer Alexa Morrison outlines why we welcome this and what it means for wildlife and climate.

    The Scottish Government ruling out fracking is a win for climate and wildlife – and for the precautionary principle


    Last year, the SNP…

    • 3 Oct 2017