Plants, flowers and shrubs 2022; Share your photos here

After a successful thread started back in March 2020 at the start of the first lockdown, its probably about time to start a new one for 2022. Thank you to all for your contributions, no matter how small or big, each has been valuable and interesting, and hopefully you will continue to contribute to the 2022 thread.

The old thread: Plants, flowers and shrubs; Share your photos here can be viewed on the link below

https://community.rspb.org.uk/chat/f/the-tea-rooms/206836/plants-flowers-and-shrubs-share-your-photos-here#pifragment-4313=1

I'll kickstart this thread with some snowdrops that have come out in flower, crocuses will be out in many places soon, and then daffodils, and many more to follow throughout the year, and it will be nice to see what wild or garden plants, flowers or shrubs you come across on your wanders or around your garden. Without these plants, flowers and shrubs, nature would struggle to survive, they all a part of the valuable cycle of life, insects need them, birds need the insects, and so on through to the mammals,

I mentioned daffodils, these shoots are growing very well among the snowdrops, and  it won't be long before the bluebells start showing shoots...

Mike

Flickr Peak Rambler

  • My camellias are starting to flush 

    Witch Hazel

    Cin J

  • Thanks, Mike, for the new thread. Our Hellebores are blooming, the Daffodils are in bud and Mr GB went out a few days ago to buy Snowdrops. There were none in this garden when we arrived, so the plan is to buy a few plants every year for the foreseeable future rather than planting bulbs, on the theory that plants in the green do better than dry bulbs. I have no idea if that is true but one or both of us must have heard it somewhere. Hope someone here tells us if that is rubbish or not!

    Kind regards, Ann

  • Snowdrops are best if planted in the green. It’s worth asking friends or neighbors if they are splitting clumps and they have a snowdrop you like.

    Cin J

  • In reply to Gardenbirder:

    Gardenbirder said:
    Thanks, Mike, for the new thread. Our Hellebores are blooming, the Daffodils are in bud and Mr GB went out a few days ago to buy Snowdrops. There were none in this garden when we arrived, so the plan is to buy a few plants every year for the foreseeable future rather than planting bulbs, on the theory that plants in the green do better than dry bulbs. I have no idea if that is true but one or both of us must have heard it somewhere. Hope someone here tells us if that is rubbish or not!

    You're welcome, please share some photos.

    Our daffs are suddenly growing profusely after a very slow start, catching up on lost time possibly.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Germain:

    Germain said:
    Snowdrops are best if planted in the green. It’s worth asking friends or neighbors if they are splitting clumps and they have a snowdrop you like.

    I've plenty of snowbells, they're taking over a planter at the moment, but that'll be brought into check later this year.

    Something I wanted to get done last year, well, get my gardener to do, was plant bluebells and snowdrops, in a tree and bush covered area at the bottom of the garden, but as we know, the weather last year was not the best for planting, so perhaps later this year.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • Lovely to see proof of springtime on the way. thanks for the photos everyone. .................. still pretty chilly outside here but spells of sunshine so not too bad compared to some winters.

    _________________________________________________________________________

    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • I want to find an app or someone in the know to help me id this one

    Cin J

  • CinJ, Those are lovely Snowdrops, but then I have never seen one I did not like! Sorry that I cannot help with ID and apparently there are zillions of varieties. Thanks for confirmation that planting Snowdrops in the green is best. Unfortunately, our friends nearby have no interest in gardening and we rarely see friends who are farther away, certainly ever since the start of the pandemic. But luckily, there are about half a dozen garden centres only a short drive away.

    Mike, I would love to post photos but I do not have a camera and my now-defunct phone was an ancient and cheap one. After a couple of requests for Mr GB to take some photos, I will not carry on asking as I do not want to be a nag! If you remember, I mentioned last year that he had bought a camera on which he took Fox cub photos and the camera has not gone out since then until a few nights ago. It was left out for two nights, but sadly, there was no Fox activity in the back garden either night. I worry that the female from last year may have come to grief--there is an awful lot of traffic locally and to go hunting from our garden, she had to cross a busy road. It may be some time before another Fox works out that we have a prime spot for having cubs--under our shed where it is warm and dry.

    Kind regards, Ann

  • In reply to Gardenbirder:

    Gardenbirder said:
    CinJ, 


    Mike, I would love to post photos but I do not have a camera and my now-defunct phone was an ancient and cheap one. After a couple of requests for Mr GB to take some photos, I will not carry on asking as I do not want to be a nag! If you remember, I mentioned last year that he had bought a camera on which he took Fox cub photos and the camera has not gone out since then until a few nights ago. It was left out for two nights, but sadly, there was no Fox activity in the back garden either night. I worry that the female from last year may have come to grief--there is an awful lot of traffic locally and to go hunting from our garden, she had to cross a busy road. It may be some time before another Fox works out that we have a prime spot for having cubs--under our shed where it is warm and dry.

    I had forgotten, now you mention it, I remember the fox cubs.
    You'll just have to sneak the camera away from Mr GB, we'll help you get set up and running....   

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Germain:

    Germain, one of my local NT properties Angelsey Abbey near Cambridge has a very extensive `Snowdrop collection 150+ I think. You could try asking them if they could ID your species.
    Email angleseyabbey@nationaltrust.org.uk
    Tele +441223810080

    Could be worth try sending them a picture.


    Tony

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/wherryman/