New DSLR from Canon replacing the 7D MkII and the 80D

  • In reply to Mike B:

    Michael B said:
    with you at the helm

    Flattery will get you anywhere Mike 

  • In reply to TeeJay:

    TeeJay said:
    It's good to see that Canon are still prepared to produce new DSLR's because the trend seems to be going towards full frame mirrorless cameras. Sony has been the market leader in mirrorless and Canon and Nikon have been desperately trying to catch up with their R mount and Z mount systems respectively. Panasonic too have been trying to get in on the act with their latest offerings after years of being one of the best micro four thirds camera producers.
    I don't think the mirrorless offerings from Canon and Nikon are particularly suitable for wildlife and sports photographers so unless you want to ditch your existing kit and switch to Sony we are probably stuck with DSLR's.
    On paper the new Canon 90D looks quite attractive for us amateur wildlife photographers with it's high burst rate, new sensor and high megapixel images (32.5). Probably a good upgrade for existing 70D and 80D owners but not sure whether its' worth it for 7DMk2 users although this is getting rather long in the tooth now.
    I wonder how much longer the likes of Canon and Nikon will continue to introduce new DSLR's. It will be interesting to hear Whistling Joe's take on all this.

    I think mirrorless is the way forward, though as yet, it's probably still a bit in its infancy. Though I've said that, what are compacts? Exactly that, mirrorless effectively and there are some good ones around.

    I've the Canon SX280, it has manual exposure controls the same as a DSLR, and TBH, will do the job of a DSLR, except, you can't attach filters....

    What I'd hate to see, is the demise of the viewfinder, that is brilliant for getting to see what's in the frame, and also for obscuring sunlight.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Whistling Joe:

    Whistling Joe said:
    I'm actually a bit heartened by the 90D - all the rumours about it being a replacement for the 7D2 & 80D are somewhat thrown in the air. The rumours talked about dual processor, dual card slot as well as the 10fps & better sensor. Whilst we've got the upgraded sensor (no surprise, that's normal with a new body) and 10fps is a good uplift from the 80D, the rest of the actual spec is nothing surprising really. Ergonomically, it's an 80D (albeit with the joystick added, which will be a benefit). What Canon have done is produce something that will get 80D owners to upgrade, but someone with a 7D2? Not so sure. All you'd get is a better sensor, but everything else downgraded. That suggests that maybe, just maybe, Canon have left open the window for a 7D3. Which is good news. The biggest problem with the 80D is the AF speed - the 7D2 simply blows it away when you're tracking stuff in flight. That second processor really makes a difference. Now the 90D has a newer processor - but it's also shifting a lot more data with 10fps & a bigger sensor, so have they bumped the AF performance as well? Impossible to say until someone can do a proper side by side comparison, but, with the same 45 point AF as the 80D I'm betting it's not much different. There are also subtle differences in AF performance that are not so obvious. Some bodies, like the 7D2 & 5D4 can drive some of the Big Whites harder & faster than the bulk of bodies. Has that ability been added to the 90D? Not seen anything about it yet, but I doubt it.
    So there's a window still for the 7D3. As-current ergonomics, dual processor, dual slot, 60+ points superior AF as today, but upgraded sensor, uplifted fps to maybe 12 or more. £1.6k price point. Announced alongside the 1DX3 that's expected for the Olympics (Canon have lined up a 1DX & 7D before). Maybe with mirrorless versions, as the 90D was announced with the M6 Mk2 (which are essentially the same innards in different bodies). It actually makes sense for Canon to do that - do one lot of development & research costs and then put the result into two different body styles. That way you don't alienate your market whilst people are slowly drifting towards mirrorless, without incurring huge extra costs supporting multiple sectors.
    Only time will tell - but my cheque book won't be coming out yet either, whereas a 7D3 would have earned Canon an order immediately

    Nicely put. 

    While at the Photography Show earlier this year, I felt Canon were dragging their heels somewhat on mirrorless, but to be fair, I wasn't in the market for M/L, so I didn't look deeply enough in to it. But it did put me off when they started talking about you'll need this adaptor for this and that adaptor for that....

    But, as I said, I didn't fully do my research, I wasn't in the market for M/L, so I may have missed some vital info.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to PimperneBloke:

    PimperneBloke said:

    Michael B said:
    with you at the helm

    Flattery will get you anywhere Mike 

               

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • In reply to Mike B:

    Michael B said:
    I felt Canon were dragging their heels somewhat on mirrorless, but to be fair, I wasn't in the market for M/L, so I didn't look deeply enough in to it. But it did put me off when they started talking about you'll need this adaptor for this and that adaptor for that....

    I still think SLR's will be dead in 20 years, completely replaced by Mirrorless. I know battery life is not quite as good, because of the drain by the live view, and I think they could have left the camera SLR sized with a bigger battery, but from what I hear, the only major disadvantage at the moment is AF response time, which means they aren't quite as good for action, eg bird-in-flight. I think the adapter is just so people don't have to re-new their lens range all in one go (and because the mirrorless lens range is not any where near complete).

    __________

    Nige   Flickr

  • In reply to Nigel O:

    Nigel O said:
    I still think SLR's will be dead in 20 years, completely replaced by Mirrorless. 

    not sure I'll be toting any camera around in 20 years, assuming I'm still around, unless my zimmer frame comes with motorised 4wd wheels,  a comfy seat, camera clamp and camouflage overhead rain cover - and somewhere to store my sandwiches and bird food -   Might have to be amphibious version if I go to Leighton Moss during winter months !    Jim's handy at DIY looking at his homemade camera trolley so I'll ask him to make me one in advance   lol 

    _________________________________________________________________________

    Regards, Hazel 

    "Each kindness shown to birds or men is sure to flutter back again" 

  • Part of the problem is that the mirror less inventors all believe that they have to produce something smaller and lighter than they have produced before - they mistakenly believe that everyone wants that. I dont, I want a tool to use , one that fits my hands, has a nice sense of balance, something with enough weight to whelp it’s stability especially if I need to use the lcd screen rather than the viewfinder. I actually felt my 7dmkii wasn’t right until I added the battery pack. Again there is the viewfinder/ lcd screen element - I much prefer to use a viewfinder for several reasons - 1: the camera is much more stable( especially at full zoom or long lens, if it is pressed against my head Becoming a natural extension of my eyes rather than wFting about at arms length. 2: if I have to use the lcd screen I have to use my reading glasses which means I no longer have a broader view than the what I can see in the lcd screen and that is retry unacceptable for longer lens wildlife viewing. I’m sure that one day they will resolve all of the current mirrorless problems but I hope they don’t lose sight of what makes customers actually want.

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    Cheers,

    Bob

    My Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobs_retired_now/

  • In reply to HAZY:

    I am staying put with my 7DMk2 and 5DMk4 can't be upgrading anymore I am not getting any younger :) and I wondered why my ears were burning Hazel, I will look into an amphibious version posibly with a small outboard on it :)

    Jim

    My Pictures

  • In reply to Bobs_Still_Retired:

    Bobs_Still_Retired said:
    Part of the problem is that the mirror less inventors all believe that they have to produce something smaller and lighter than they have produced before - they mistakenly believe that everyone wants that. I dont,

    Totally agree - mirrorless so far seem to be aimed at new users rather than converting existing DSLR people.  At least as far as us wildlife shooters are concerned.  The ergonomics of the modern DSLR is excellent & mirrorless doesn't come close - yet the parts are all there, it's hardly the most difficult thing to stuff the mirrorless gubbins inside a bigger DSLR body.  I can only assume it's all some cunning plan to try and extract more purchases from photographers who've not yet cottoned on to the importance of having a good body to grip & buttons to press & that we'll get our desires fulfilled in the upcoming years.

    That sounds a bit "Ooer missus!" :-)

    ___

    Find me on Flickr / All about your camera - The Getting off Auto Index

  • In reply to Bobs_Still_Retired:

    Bobs_Still_Retired said:
    Part of the problem is that the mirror less inventors all believe that they have to produce something smaller and lighter than they have produced before - they mistakenly believe that everyone wants that. I dont, I want a tool to use , one that fits my hands, has a nice sense of balance, something with enough weight to whelp it’s stability especially if I need to use the lcd screen rather than the viewfinder. I actually felt my 7dmkii wasn’t right until I added the battery pack. Again there is the viewfinder/ lcd screen element - I much prefer to use a viewfinder for several reasons - 1: the camera is much more stable( especially at full zoom or long lens, if it is pressed against my head Becoming a natural extension of my eyes rather than wFting about at arms length. 2: if I have to use the lcd screen I have to use my reading glasses which means I no longer have a broader view than the what I can see in the lcd screen and that is retry unacceptable for longer lens wildlife viewing. I’m sure that one day they will resolve all of the current mirrorless problems but I hope they don’t lose sight of what makes customers actually want.

    I'm totally with you Bob, and WJ, as mentioned earlier, my preference is for the viewfinder, not a large LCD screen, which is the way things are going these days, not just cameras, but most things.

    Like you, I use reading glasses (but only in the last couple of years), which again, would make things uncomfortable to view on a large screen, but prior to requiring reading glasses, I still didn't like large LCD screens.

    It makes me laugh when I hear folk struggling to use these screens in brilliant sunlight, though some with a DSLR, I have shown them how to use the viewfinder, and the positive feedback makes those few seconds worth the while.

    I also prefer the shape, size and weight of a DSLR for comfortable grip an.

    Mirrorless seems to be aimed at the gadget generation, because it's new/modern technology, it's deemed to be the "be all and end all".

    One prime reason why I don't take much video, to get a half decent usable camera costs a lot of money, which is a shame, the 5D MkIV, and my old 750D both take god video, but you have to sue the large LCD screen, which for me is where the old shoebox camcorders (I still have my old Canon Vid8) were good.

    I think as Hazy says, I too could be feeding the daisies by then.

    Incidentally Hazy, you can get some very good waterproof cameras, though they are compact style. When I say waterproof, I mean a lot deeper than any of us would paddle, unless, you have aqualungs....

    I bought a Pentax WG-3 many years ago for adverse weather on the hills and moors, and apart from the battery which has suffered a lack of use in the last few years, it's been faultless.

    Coffee break over, need to get back to work.....

    Catch you all alter,

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler