How to help a baby bird?

There was a baby pigeon or (ring collar dove) sat on a bench outside my window for the last few hours. Very wet. I’ve just brought it inside, didn’t try and move when I approached it, it’s now in a box with a towel and some seeds. It’s a fair size, about a blackbird size so thought it could fly, could it just be bedraggled/exhausted from the storm/ rain? Did I do the right thing? Should I do anything else? 

  • Any chance of a pic?
    Where are you located? There are rescue services available ... try www.helpwildlife.co.uk

     

     2013 photos & vids here

    eff37 on Flickr

  • I’ve no idea how to upload a pic!
    I’m near Dereham, Norfolk. The bird is still alive although not eaten any seeds. It is fully feathered, it can stand, there’s a nest nearby so thinking maybe it had its first attempt? It hasn’t tried to fly when I’ve opened the box.
  • Is there any improvement in weather? Maybe try putting bird outside again when you are able to watch for possible predators or contact local helpwildlife.co.uk/.../ 

    Is your bird same as one in this thread which is full of advice ... https://community.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/f/wildlife-questions/200833/help-caring-for-a-collared-dove/1232325#1232325

     

     2013 photos & vids here

    eff37 on Flickr

  • I've taken it to my Dads on the way to work this morning as I couldn't get to one of the centres, he is going to put the bird outside with him whiles he's pottering about and hopefully he will take off! Thanks for replying and sending the link - some useful info for the future!
  • Do let us know if bird OK

     

     2013 photos & vids here

    eff37 on Flickr

  • I'm afraid the best action would have been to leave it alone and keep a safe distance. The rule with young birds is always, without exception, to not intervene unless there is imminent danger, e.g. bird stood in a road. Birds are used to rain, and although young birds can die due to bad weather like recent days, that is nature. Rescue centres will be frustrated with people collecting up young birds every year.

    It could well be the case the individual ended up dying if left. Many young birds do. But unless people are qualified and experienced at looking after young birds, they shouldn't get involved. Parent birds are better at caring for their offspring.

    Not trying to lecture, but wanted to write this incase the thread gets read by others in a similar situation.
  • Happy to report that the bird flew off this afternoon after a few attempts in my Dad's garden this afternoon.

    I'm not experienced at looking after young birds and of course the parent bird is better at caring for their offspring but if I can offer a warm box for a bird to rest and recuperate in overnight rather than being killed by a cat - I will.
  • Such welcome news, thanks for letting us know & for your timely care!

     

     2013 photos & vids here

    eff37 on Flickr

  • Cats are another story. So if you saw a cat in the vicinity of the baby bird, the correct action there is to remove the cat, not the baby bird. Whether it's a rescue centre, RSPB advice which is available online, experienced bird handlers or whoever, the advice is the same. Do not handle or get involved with baby birds unless they are in imminent danger.

    Again, not lecturing. Just wanted to write correct course of action so people reading this thread will know for future reference.
  • I disagree with you Wendy as nothing written in this thread suggests anything other than death.