Wood pigeon not moving from nest, in distress?

Hi,

a couple of wood pigeons decided to build a nest in a tree on the front of the house in a rather low position (about 2mts from ground), so they are quite visible. After lot of cooing and coupling, the couple started incubating the eggs, and every morning there was a lot of going in and out of the nest, I suppose to exchange incubating duty and to feed. But since a few days the (male?) seems to have disappeared, and the female (?) just sit in the nest with very little stirring. 

I'm worried the male may have had a mishap and the female is in distress, but I'm refraining from handing food/water in the nest in case this causes issues. Although quite visible I believe the bird thinks to be invisible from humans in its current nest position.

Any suggestions?

Thank you,

Fran

  • So long as you don't encroach the nest, then no harm will be done.

    Nature can be harsh to watch at times, however you can leave food and water out for them, and while it may seem harsh, leave nature to its own devices.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler

  • After 4-5 days of waiting for the missing partner she got tired and now spend extensive periods out of the nest. She got 2 eggs but I think they won't hatch now. Maybe will use the nest again if she find another partner!
  • After 4-5 days of waiting for the missing partner she got tired and now spend extensive periods out of the nest. She got 2 eggs but I think they won't hatch now. Maybe will use the nest again if she find another partner!
  • In reply to Fran Nott:

    Fran Nott said:
    After 4-5 days of waiting for the missing partner she got tired and now spend extensive periods out of the nest. She got 2 eggs but I think they won't hatch now. Maybe will use the nest again if she find another partner!

    It is possible, however, nature is very resourceful given the chance, and you never know, there's a chance another male will come along.

    However, the important thing is, not to interfere with the nest, let nature take its course, and if the eggs are no longer kept warm, then it will help feed some other young birds, ie magpies, crows, etc, who also will have families requiring food.

    Yes it is harsh, but that is nature.

    Mike

    Flickr Peak Rambler